Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • LIV: Welcome, everybody.

  • I'm Liv. I'm a cook here.

  • And I'm just honored today to be here with John Jeavons and

  • to introduce him to you.

  • If you care anything about what your food tastes like, if

  • you've dug a fork into food, you really care about digging

  • a fork into the Earth.

  • And that's my whole connection to all of this.

  • You care about not just the quality of food, but whether

  • food is going to feed everybody on this planet,

  • which is one of the main questions we have to answer

  • these days--

  • enough food, enough nutritious food for everybody.

  • When I was assigned to China as a reporter a few years ago,

  • for me, the most heartbreaking thing I saw was in the

  • countryside to see these dense concentrations of farmers who

  • were asked to leave the land that they had farmed for

  • generations and put in densely populated living conditions no

  • longer close to their land because

  • land was that precious.

  • And the government wanted to develop it.

  • And here, I saw people who knew the art of farming--

  • and it is indeed an art, growing food

  • and growing it well--

  • who had been through chemical industrial farming who were

  • told that some of the land that they farm was now too

  • toxic, over-fertilized, and over-chemicalized for them to

  • do any more, but who still in their genes and just one

  • generation back knew how to grow food in mainly a

  • sustainable way.

  • And to me, I brought that home with me.

  • And to me, it's the overriding question for this age

  • and for all of us.

  • So from the time I was an immigrant that arrived in this

  • country, I'd heard about double digging.

  • I'd heard about biointensive.

  • And today, for me to meet John and realize that he is this

  • complete visionary who isn't just a farmer, but is thinking

  • about food for all of us and for the future of this planet

  • is indeed an honor.

  • So please welcome John.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • JOHN JEAVONS: Thank you, Liv. Take the

  • lights down on the screen.

  • They got me lit.

  • Before we begin, I'd like to make one

  • reflection to set the tone.

  • What Liz said about China in some way reminded me of it.

  • In 1995, we had an intern come and train with us in Northern

  • California for six months.

  • And he shared with me that the cost of farmable soil in

  • Monterey, Mexico, was $4 a pound.

  • Do you realize that gasoline only costs $50 a pound

  • currently at the pump?

  • $50.

  • Oh, there we go again.

  • We're going to have to redo this one.

  • Do you realize that in Monterey, Mexico, that

  • farmable soil, if you go to purchase it, costs $4 a pound,

  • where gasoline at the pumps today costs $0.50 a pound.

  • So they have their priorities right.

  • They realize the preciousness of the soil.

  • And they realize that the soil is worth eight times gasoline.

  • Wow.

  • That's really hard to wrap our minds around, I think.

  • Even for me, it is, and I've been working

  • with this for 41 years.

  • So now let's go and look at our presentation for today,

  • Food for the Future Now.

  • To know, challenge, and hope.

  • To feel, relieved and empowered.

  • And to do, act where you are.

  • Creating a new and better world.

  • Creating a new and better world.

  • This is going to be the only thing we need to focus on.

  • The joy of the process, it's really a lot of fun.

  • You can see the happiness in my daughter's face.

  • And even manual food-raising, which is really

  • skill-intensive, not

  • work-intensive, is a lot of fun.

  • The Earth needs our help now.

  • You probably know that already.

  • But this is literally the Earth that's underneath our

  • feet needs our help right now.

  • Let's grow soil.

  • It's not about farming it.

  • It's about growing it.

  • Every time we eat a pound of food grown with regular

  • food-raising practices, an average of 6 pounds in the

  • United States, 12 pounds in developing countries, where

  • 90% of the world's people live, and 18 pounds in China,

  • where 20% of the world's people live, and 24 pounds of

  • farmable soil in California are lost due to wind and water

  • erosion because of the types of practices being used.

  • In contrast, over here on the right, you can see

  • Biointensive Sustainable Mini-Farming has the capacity

  • to build, to grow, to create up to 20 pounds of farmable

  • soil per pound of food eaten--

  • not deplete 6 to 24 pounds per pound of food eaten, but to

  • build up to 20 pounds of farmable soil, soil we need to

  • feed people.

  • I don't think anyone realizes the number of people that are

  • born each day, really.

  • It's 216,000 people net.

  • That's births less deaths.

  • It's like Motel 6, and the light's on all the time.

  • This is enough to repopulate San

  • Francisco every three days.

  • Wow.

  • Costa Rica every 17.

  • Mexico City, the second largest city in the world, 3.5

  • times a year.

  • And Beijing, China, 8.6 times a year.

  • What does this mean?

  • It means--

  • and this is even more important than those

  • population statistics--

  • it means that 34,000 additional acres of farmable

  • soil need to be found or built daily to feed these people.

  • It's not happening.

  • It's probable that organic farming indirectly results in

  • the loss of three to five and a quarter pounds of farmable

  • soil per pound of food eaten because of the needs of inputs

  • in the form of compost, manure, and organic fertilizer

  • which are taken from other soils.

  • So we may have our perfect organic farm.

  • But we're depleting a soil somewhere else

  • in order to do it.

  • We don't need to.

  • But the pattern we're using now does.

  • Organic farming is a good start.

  • It's a great start.

  • It's a major positive step towards more sustainable

  • agriculture.

  • Yet, we need to take at least three

  • more major steps forward.

  • We need to go beyond organic.

  • The planet is becoming increasingly urbanized.

  • Something that's incredible is India's already 91% urban,

  • China 90% urban.

  • That's 40% of the world's

  • population virtually urbanized.

  • One of the results of this urbanization is that we're

  • losing our farming literacy.

  • We don't really know how to farm.

  • As a result of all these factors, agriculture, as it

  • is, population growth, the loss of our farming skill

  • base, most of the world's soils have become

  • significantly demineralized, compacted, and contain little

  • organic matter unless all these

  • elements have been imported.

  • This isn't a pretty picture.

  • Though, I think the art here is very pretty.

  • You can make a case that the entire planet may be

  • desertified in as little as 69 years.

  • I'm 70 years old.

  • That's in less time than I've been here on the planet.

  • | don't know how long you've been here.

  • But that's a short time.

  • What to do?

  • We need to make farming truly sustainable on as much of a

  • closed system basis as possible.

  • It is possible.

  • We need to grow our own organic matter inputs on the

  • soil we cultivate and recycle all the nutrients--

  • all the nutrients--

  • contained in the crops we grow back into the soil.

  • The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has

  • noted that 13 years from now, in the year 2025--

  • that's soon--

  • about 2/3 of the world's people, 5 billion people, will

  • probably not have sufficient water available for food

  • growing to live a life with reasonable

  • nutrition if at all.

  • We don't have to wait for 2025 for that to happen.

  • We're going to see that happening in just three years,

  • the effect of this.

  • This means a situation of peak water and peak food.

  • 70% to 80% of all the water used by people in the world is

  • utilized in food production.

  • There is some hope.

  • We'll get to that soon.

  • You can also make a case that as little as 49 years of

  • farmable soil remains on the Earth.

  • This is partly because as the soil quality is depleted, the

  • rate of depletion increases more rapidly.

  • So we have a situation of peak farmable soil.

  • And it's here now.

  • There's also a major different kind of peak energy crisis.

  • The peak energy crisis really is between these two points

  • and these two points--

  • our will, the will to face these things and make a

  • positive difference.

  • And I wouldn't tell you these things if we couldn't make a

  • positive difference.

  • Feed your dreams and your fears will starve.

  • So in the future, as you begin to be overwhelmed by

  • challenges, and there's a good chance that we will all have

  • that feeling some of the time, feed your dreams. And you'll

  • find that the dream that you're envisioning will begin

  • to manifest.

  • And the reason that we can dream these dreams is because

  • there are realistic solutions.

  • We need to utilize our skillful will.

  • There are psychologists who have studied the different

  • forms of will that we have. And the most important one is

  • skillful will, the ability to make and fulfill our choices

  • with the greatest efficiency and least effort necessary.

  • I think Google is dedicated to this concept.

  • What we need is a transformational paradigm

  • throughout many areas, including food-raising.

  • Growing food was actually the original green.

  • And it can be again.

  • In fact, 10,000 years ago--

  • this is unbelievable if you really sink into

  • this and feel it.

  • This next thing is just totally

  • unbelievable and wonderful.

  • 10,000 years ago, early Stone Age farmers raised 100% of

  • their calories per person with just 20 hours of labor

  • annually, growing the first spelt wheat.

  • These people were farming literate.

  • I often give participants in our workshop a handicap, a

  • fivefold handicap.

  • And I challenge them to learn how to grow all their food in

  • 100 hours a year during the following three years.

  • We really can do it.

  • We don't believe we can, but that's where the problem is,

  • here and here.

  • In 1911, China grew complete diets on 3,600 square feet.

  • And China, Japan, and Korea used biologically-intensive

  • farming successfully for four millennia until the 1950s when

  • current practices began to be adopted.

  • The Chinese used to call their farmers living libraries.

  • And if you want to read about this type of farming, there's

  • a book out by F.H. King called Farmers of Forty Centuries.

  • I recommend you read it.

  • It's published by Dover Press, and it's not expensive.

  • In the Philippines, the illiterate Hanunoo Stone Age

  • culture have a 200-crop, 5-year rotation with 40

  • varieties of rice grown annually.

  • So no matter what the climate, hot, cold, wet, or dry, they

  • achieve a sufficient quantity of calories.

  • They are living libraries too.

  • There are no agricultural universities that I know of in

  • the world that have any kind of rotation system that's as