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  • I love open data.

  • I love that governments are taking their data, cleaning it anonymous izing it and putting it out to the world.

  • I love the transparency that comes with open data.

  • You should know what your government's up to.

  • I love that if you check the weather app or you knew what time your bus was coming today, that was open data.

  • I love the innovation that we can inspire in our economy.

  • When governments released data last year, I was working on open data and the government of Canada and I got to learn about the Data Liberation Initiative.

  • Back in the day, the Canadian Association of Public Data users made a deal with the government toe access, government data and so originally, once a year.

  • Eventually, once a month, the government would mail data to these data users originally using floppy disks.

  • Eventually, using CD ROM's and these data users, they would come together in the libraries and the reason research centers of our country.

  • And they would look at government's data Today.

  • In contrast, anybody anywhere can access data from hundreds of governments with just a couple of clicks.

  • Technology has changed the world government has never had such great tools and technologies to serve citizens.

  • Technology is changing the very fabric of our society.

  • I'm not just talking about the Internet.

  • I'm talking about artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of things.

  • Computers have never been faster, cheaper.

  • Our leaders there on Twitter.

  • They're on instagram.

  • They're broadcasting live technology is changing government and it's bringing with it.

  • The promise of service is that are better, faster and more attuned to the needs of our unique communities.

  • And yet her communities, they don't trust government institutions.

  • We have never been so polarized in an era when you can skip the dishes with just a couple of clicks and you can hail a ride from the palm of your hand.

  • Governments are failing to provide reliable access to simple websites.

  • The world has changed and government is failing to keep up.

  • So today, friends, let's talk about digital government.

  • I'd like to offer you a vision as well as a few case studies stories from here at home in British Columbia, but together give me cause for hope.

  • But let's start first with the board burning platform.

  • Why does this matter?

  • I look around the world and I see turmoil.

  • I see the UK bracing for Brexit the U.

  • S.

  • In the midst of a trade war.

  • We've got a climate crisis.

  • We've got an affordability crisis and youth from New York to Hong Kong to Prince George.

  • They're screaming to be heard.

  • So what's the government to dio in the face of all this turmoil?

  • Well, I would argue it's time to get back to basics.

  • The purpose of government is to serve citizens and to improve our lives in the digital age.

  • Government needs to be digital by default.

  • One of the first times that I heard about the concept of digital government.

  • It was in reference to Estonia and their their vision of an invisible government.

  • The idea was that government service is should be automated around life events, birth, death, unemployment.

  • Any of these sorts of things would spur automated service delivery, reducing bureaucracy.

  • More and more governments around the world are coalescing around these kinds of ambitious visions.

  • You take the digital nine, the leading nine digital countries.

  • They have explicitly decided that they're going to embrace technology to serve citizens before we get too far, though, what does digital government mean, it's an idea clearly whose time has come for me.

  • Digital government means governments taking modern tools, tools from the Internet age from the Fourth Industrial Revolution and using them to deliver service is that warrant the trust of citizens.

  • I've seen a lot of different governments do this kind of work in my experience, proficient governments that are good at digital tend to adopt habits in three big categories.

  • First, they're obsessed with the users with the citizens.

  • They literally sit people down and they watch them click through websites, click through APS, and they see where they stumble.

  • And when they do stumble the government's redesign.

  • They recognize that the citizens are always right.

  • They recognize also that in jurisdictions like British Columbia, there is a digital divide.

  • They recognize that not everybody is connected to the Internet.

  • Not everybody's comfortable online, and so they designed for everybody.

  • They recognize that there are vulnerable communities, and sometimes these new technologies they can entrench bias.

  • And so they designed for inclusion.

  • Second, these governments, they're agile in software development.

  • When we talk about being agile, it means essentially that we set a goal for ourselves.

  • We take a few steps towards that goal.

  • And then before we get too far, we stop and we look at what we just learned and we use those learnings to design.

  • Our next steps are next Sprint.

  • Being agile means that we have the courage to release code early and often, and we have the discipline to impose on ourselves a culture and processes that are conducive to great outcomes.

  • We embrace agility not just in software, but in everything.

  • We d'oh the third big category of habits.

  • It's that these governments there open like me.

  • They love open data, which means, of course, data that anybody, anywhere, anytime, can access, they can download it, share it, manipulated thes governments.

  • They work in the open.

  • They embrace open source code, They believe in open innovation.

  • They recognize that at any given moment in time, they don't employ every single person or possess every single resource that could lead to a positive outcome.

  • And so they build with communities.

  • So that's digital government.

  • I know that many of you are probably thinking, well, that's a bit rich having a government official standing up there talking about the promise of digital when there are these big I T failures, Yes, healthcare dot gov in the U.

  • S.

  • The Phoenix pay system in Canada Thes air big I t projects that went wrong.

  • Digital government is a bet that when we're open, when we're agile, when we designed with and four users we get better government and that can lead to a better society.

  • I'm gonna try to make this a little bit more concrete, and I'd like to offer a few stories from here at home in British Columbia, and I'd like to start with one that is very near and dear to my heart, which is the exchange lab.

  • The lab is a place since a physical place in Victoria.

  • And it for me represents a recognition that when we take on these ambitious visions for a brighter future, sometimes we have to fundamentally redesign our processes.

  • The lab is a place where government ministries can come and they bring their tough, tough problems.

  • The lab helps them to find the problem.

  • And then teams thumb up with top Tak talent so that together they can build solutions at any given time.

  • There up to 12 teams in the lab and right now, they're working on topics like conservation impair empowering patients through access to health information, data driven approaches to climate change.

  • These are some of the toughest problems of our age.

  • I'll try to make it a little bit more concrete with a specific story.

  • One of my favorites is Vote.

  • Aaron Aaron is a mine inspector, and he works for the Ministry of Energy Minds and Petroleum Resources.

  • He came into the lab last year, and he he didn't have the information that he needed to taken evidence based and risk based approach.

  • Thio inspecting minds.

  • So the lab team come up with some top technologists, and together they created the Mines Digital service, essentially gathering all the relevant information, analyzing it, dash boarding it and giving mine inspectors like Aaron the information that he needed to keep our minds and our community safe.

  • Sometimes when we do this kind of work, we also come up with big barriers, things that are slowing us down.

  • And one of the things that the lab took on in the last couple of years is around procurement.

  • Often it's tough for government to buy technology quickly, and so they took a process that can often take up to 12 months, and they reduced it down to 17 days contract award within 17 days of having received the bids.

  • This kind of innovation allows government to more effectively work with small businesses and means that we can have more innovation within our communities.

  • I like to move to a second category of examples.

  • Identity Identity is the backbone of the digital economy in British Columbia.

  • We've had a number of successes.

  • The service's card is a great one.

  • They're about five million people in British Columbia, and so far 4.6 million have a service card.

  • And this is basically a unified identity card.

  • British Columbia was the first jurisdiction in North America to successfully take the driver's license and the health card and bring them together.

  • This is exciting because it means we can on board all sorts of other different government service is into the success case.

  • We can also be more ambitious, though, because to collaborate in the digital age, we need trust.

  • We need to have a degree of confidence that the corporations and the people who were interacting with online are who they say there normally to get that kind of trust.

  • We build user names, passwords, that sort of thing.

  • But they're administered by third parties who may not always have credibility in an age of surveillance capitalism.

  • There are so many different entities who are hungry for our data, and it's absolutely critical that we build a trust system that works for everybody.

  • So in the government of British Columbia, the corporate registrar took on the task of adopting new technology.

  • Using Blockchain, they put the power in the hands of the data owner so that that data owner could put their information on the distributed leisure ledger and through a series of cryptographic codes through hashes, they could ensure that there wouldn't be undue manipulation of that information.

  • What this does is essentially enable digital secure interactions like to pivot to third category of examples around service design.

  • I talked earlier about how a digital government, a highly proficient digital government, designs with and four users.

  • Service design is really what that what that means.

  • It means we're very thoughtful and inclusive in designing the way government serves the people an example.

  • Last year, British Columbia was on fire, 1.4 million Hector's were on fire.

  • In the summer of 2018 over 2000 people were evacuated.

  • Over 5000 people were mobilized to fight the fires at a cost of $615 million.

  • Who's devastating?

  • So what government did?

  • They decided?

  • Let's see if we can get some insight through Data Analytics to help fight these problems going forward.

  • They took it a number of different data sources.

  • I'm talking top A graphical maps, tree density data, historic fire patterns, lightning strike data and build these into three D maps so that emergency preparedness professionals as well as leadership could take a look at these different maps and use that to build up the strategies.

  • Service design can often be much simpler.

  • It's about more than just taking forms and putting them on the Internet, though one specific example is previously in British Columbia.

  • When people were getting divorced, they would have to fill out a form and take it in to a counter in the court.

  • Well, unfortunately, people were making a lot of mistakes, you know, probably through no fault of their own.

  • It's a stressful time, and they probably weren't the easiest worms.

  • But essentially what government did is embarked on a service design process.

  • People were having to come back with these forms up to seven times.

  • So they looked at where the errors were often being made in these forms and designed cleaner, more meaningful process, providing an online wizard so that people could more easily and put the relevant information, hopefully reducing stress at it.

  • Otherwise, Taif tough time all these examples.

  • They go far beyond just efficiency.

  • Yes, there's the efficiency piece, but there's also a fundamental rethinking of how government operates.

  • You can think for the first time about inclusion through digital.

  • You can imagine a world where, instead of, you know, a single parent having to go in taking an hour out of their job in the day to goto service counter.

  • Instead, they could be accessing government service is in the evening on their couch while their kids are in bed.

  • Similarly, you can think of somebody lives in the Downtown Eastside in Vancouver who might have had a number of addresses.

  • Or maybe they don't have an address at all.

  • Previously, that would have been a barrier to access, and government service is now.

  • It's more easy for them.

  • It's much easier for them to access.

  • Those service is so in a digital age, it seems clear that governments can do better.

  • Governments can clean up their processes.

  • Make these service is faster, easier, more citizen centric.

  • My vision is that one day, hopefully, in a not too distant future, citizens will be able to access.

  • Government service is, however, and whenever they want, if they want to deal with a human well, those humans at the service centers on the phone.

  • Those humans should be equipped with excellent tools to provide accurate, timely information, and service is.

  • And if citizens prefer to access government service, is through digital means through a chat.

  • Bott.

  • Alexa, Siri I want those digital experiences to be seamless, beautifully designed and easy in order to deliver.

  • On this, though, we need the help of citizens I want.

  • My digital service is my digital future to be based on my values, things like gender, equity, inclusion, sustainability, accessibility.

  • What do you want?

  • Technology and innovation are not an end in and of themselves, their Truls for us to get to a brighter society, one where government is truly of the surface of the service of people.

  • We can do this together.

  • We can build it as communities.

  • I'm extremely excited to build a digital future together so that we can have a digital government indeed, a government that serves everybody.

I love open data.

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信頼とデザイン。デジタルはいかにして政府の未来を救うことができるか|ジェイミー・ボイド|TEDxUNBC (Trust and Design: How Digital Can Save the Future of Government | Jaimie Boyd | TEDxUNBC)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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