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  • All right.

  • Hello, world.

  • This is CS 50 on Twitch Mining This Colton Ogden And today I'm joined by Sees fifties Connor Doyle.

  • Connor, Thank you for coming into the street.

  • Thank you.

  • What do we know what we're talking about today?

  • Yeah.

  • So welcome, everyone excited to be here on the first time on the street on today.

  • We're gonna be looking at augmented reality development specifically in Spark a R, which is a tall released by Facebook to develop argumentative Aleke applications on Android and I Let's the voices on messenger instagram.

  • So I'm pretty excited.

  • Argument really is definitely trending.

  • You and I were just talking about the suite for the stream.

  • It's been around for a few years, but I think given hardware limitations probably wasn't, you know, in its initial phase probably wasn't as popular as it's surely going to be soon.

  • Tools like spark they are, or what you're gonna talk about today are, you know, sort of what we need to be able to progress in that sense.

  • Yeah, I think right now we're even augmented Reality.

  • Is that really nebulous time?

  • This mixed reality, this virtual reality there's augmented reality.

  • There's X are all these different, kind of like a vocabulary for describing this kind of movement into the virtual round, where we're going to experiencing sort of the physical world in this kind of digital way on that kind of hybrid is, um, between the digital on the sort of physical.

  • It's kind of what they are is exploring thing on.

  • Snapchat obviously have been a big proponent.

  • They've released a similar software, the Spark I R and a lot of different unity.

  • Lot has loads of our applications not just for a mobile device, but also like hollow lens magically different things like that.

  • So there's definitely a lot of excitement about a all right now and its application or M on its application in the world.

  • But I think you're right.

  • I think, like simple tools like Spark A R, which will allow you to simply simple in the terms.

  • It's really easy to get into that quite sophisticated but simple to solve, get grips with, allow you to sort of explore the kind of story telling on dhe sort of possibilities of this media for future interaction, because I think that's what he's gonna say.

  • I think right now, like one of these devices going, It's really hard, and I was really difficult.

  • But we've got to try and envision a way in which it's gonna become very seamless with the interaction with the world.

  • And, like one weighs.

  • Let's begin to visualize how we're gonna interrupt.

  • Like you.

  • I design.

  • I know people you spark out for, like you.

  • I do things like that.

  • Like one way toe start to explore play those possibilities is using a tool like this site, right?

  • Yeah.

  • We're only as powerful as the tools that we have.

  • Yeah, And you've sort of been at the forefront of, you know, ever since the d R.

  • Face started, I was 2015.

  • You've sort of been kind of passionate about this sort of new progression that we're taking in the world of tech.

  • Yeah, and this is sort of how you came onto CS 50.

  • Would you mind talking?

  • Maybe a little bit about how you got introduces suits?

  • 50 your history with us so far?

  • Sure.

  • Yeah.

  • So, uh, so back when I was a freshman, McAnally and student at Harvard College, I'm studying Chinese literature, a senior on back when we Waas, a freshman.

  • I was really interested in like storytelling, specifically looking at kind of a theater on how theater could scale to different places around the world, or how we could give a sense of, like, different environments and bitter, like No, innit, not in an actual traditional setting.

  • So that led me into a virtual reality.

  • Actually, I went along to event in Boston that kaleidoscope held with Renee on, and it's kind of like a film best the war.

  • But virtuality experiences and I tried on a headset was immediately like, well blown away.

  • I was like, This is definitely gonna be the future of like how we experience the world, how we relate to it.

  • There's something there's a seed in it.

  • It's kind of special.

  • So that began my journey into hell.

  • And then I I was looking at sort of coding things on campus, and I can't quite see It's 50 and I reached out to David and we began talking about sort of some of the video aspects of of what's been happening.

  • It's it's 50 honestly, incredible video production team and 50 production and everyone, But I was like, Yeah, what about via What about lunch reality in education?

  • What about votes?

  • Reality and see It's 50.

  • And that's when the conversation started and we did a lot of really cool projects and developments.

  • We did tears 50 around the world, which was way sent sort of V R cameras small be our cameras to different people around the world who takes it to the online.

  • We got to see that world in environment on with films saw 22 lectures in virtual reality as well, when alongside the actual traditional capture, so that people could put a headset and be at Harvard and see David and see elections.

  • So and that's really where my journey we see a 50 started and been developing evidence is very normal product.

  • I think we may have been the first university to film their way.

  • Pretty amazing.

  • Pretty amazing accomplishment.

  • Um, but yeah, I totally agree.

  • I think that v r.

  • And they are have a lot of potential on, especially once they proliferated.

  • I think because right now it's not common.

  • I think that you see people with with the actual hardware.

  • Yeah, um, but you know, more much like computers themselves back in the eighties nineties.

  • As soon as we actually proliferate this hardware, we make this a commercialized thing.

  • Yeah, to the extent that computers are smartphones, I think you're right.

  • I think we have a lot of crazy, awesome stuff, but sort of the near future.

  • In this today, we're talking about Spike.

  • There's kind of a step in that direction.

  • I'm gonna actually switch over to your screen here.

  • Show all set here on also, why don't we pluck up a question?

  • We had also sense the rules.

  • That's a great accent.

  • Shadows to Connor for being our first UK representative on street.

  • But Andre asked x r what does that stand for?

  • Yes, So ex Aw, that's a great question, excellence.

  • The coin of So because we've got augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality sort of X r is kind of sort of this space between like, Okay, we don't really know what the reality is yet.

  • It's like a lit.

  • It's like all of them combined.

  • It's sort of like all these kind of ex nebulous stuff reality.

  • It's like an umbrella term umbrella returned, correct.

  • Peaky.

  • Blinders is also quite funny that that's a great reference.

  • I have probably about to get out.

  • Good accent.

  • Pick up there.

  • Yes.

  • Oh, but no.

  • So what you're saying, I think that, um, in terms for X are at least because of the definitional difficulties with this technology.

  • I mean, like, it's moving so fast and different.

  • Hardware providers are trying describable to try and create these kind of lightweight glasses, which enables sort of this kind of mixed reality experience always augmented reality.

  • Always holograms.

  • Or is it?

  • Projections is really kind of difficult to kind of disown, actually what this stuff is, because in the popular language, people might say a hologram is I thing that is actually projected into space.

  • There's materialized in space, and that's like what some definitions prescribe it is that and then other people, the hardware manufacturers will say that actually, it's projecting into the retina.

  • Then maybe it is just that is a hologram as well.

  • It appears to be in space, and it's a hologram.

  • So get into difficulties, different interpretations, a lot of different versions of the lot of deployments of this idea of accentuating the real world with things that are not physically there correct would have a visual sort of represented show or not just visual.

  • I mean augmented reality can can be basically anything that's adding to the reality, so it can be sort of haptic.

  • It can be auditory.

  • It can be sort of taste, smell all that sort of stuff and is really cool developments actually happening in, like, unique sense that being generated.

  • And I are like, Wait stuff that's funny.

  • I remember back in the nineties, I think there was a smell, a vision eighties with this was the thing that people tried out.

  • Obviously, the technology back there was a lot worse, probably than it is now.

  • So I'm serious.

  • I would be very curious thing that would really take people in different, especially with games.

  • Yeah, imagine going into like the first thing that popped into my mind was playing reasonable to like.

  • There's a sewer level going into a sewer level, going and immigrant Absolutely disgusting.

  • I think about Charlie and the chocolate factory where you can like every year, might take a chocolate bar out of the screen, actually smell it.

  • Yeah, and I don't know how feasible I mean on olfactory and sort of tastes are related.

  • I'm curious.

  • Like how that would evolve into, like, taste feedback.

  • Yeah, if that's even a possibility.

  • Yeah.

  • Look, taste is linked to smell quite a lot as well, so that's kind of these interesting questions.

  • And these are all gonna be potential realms.

  • I mean, it kind of seems far right now like, Oh, I'm gonna take I want to be, like, smelling self.

  • People are exploring it and, you know, maybe it's kind of it's gonna come in on grass.

  • Interesting question.

  • The actual reality has problems causing motion sickness.

  • How does that work with a R?

  • That's a great question.

  • So one of the reasons virtuality causes motion sickness or has been like said to courts motion sickness was that because basically wearing of your headset, it includes it stops you from seeing the world at all so that if your body's moving on, you're not moving in are I've been in virtual reality.

  • Sorry, fuel.

  • So if you were walking around, but the headsets not tracking properly, then you have this weird out of body experience where, like, the track kind of froze ear, and you kind of feel nauseous.

  • Where is a R?

  • Because our is projecting onto the world.

  • So it's taking the sort of given sort of visual plane as a sort of a base level and then just adding certain things on top of it.

  • Then you're not gonna get the same kind of total out of body experience because you always have a reference point in the world.

  • So even if the track doesn't track promptly, it's just gonna be like jumping around.

  • They're not gonna be like, actually throwing your kind of whole body around in the same way the others.

  • So that's one way in which motion sickness is not as much of a problem in augmented reality.

  • Which one coming over here just a little better You're getting cut off.

  • Their apologize for that are awesome.

  • So a are will make millionaires.

  • So on that note, eso spark a are So this is what you have loaded up.

  • Where can folks folks want to get Sparky first?

  • Or is it free?

  • Yeah.

  • And where can people downloaded if it is?

  • Yeah.

  • So Facebook releases completely for free.

  • Andi can download it right now and I can get up.

  • Get it up.

  • It's Barclay.

  • All that come just download.

  • I think it's about 250 megabytes or something on dhe.

  • You signing with Facebook on essentially allows you to deploy thes whatever you developed in the development environment directly to Facebook on you can share with your friends on Facebook.

  • And there's a closed instagram bater as well now as well that you can apply for.

  • So you can also release filters directly to instagram on one of the coolest things I think about this and one of the reasons why I really enjoy using this tall and advising others on using this told is that the scene was quality of it for user experience.

  • So So you built this incredible augmented of an application in immunity on real on you like, Hey, I want to show you this Really share this experience, download this app.

  • I'm like that's been one of the biggest problems, like the friction barrier there.

  • Like having people having fun like go on down there.

  • The app just experienced, like a like a simple filter or something like they're not gonna do.

  • It works well for games, I'm guessing, but not sure something that somebody could spend 10 seconds.

  • Look, don't delete the app innocently.

  • So why spot they always interesting?

  • Because it's literally just a link to if you have messenger installed, which quite a few people do.

  • Instagram.

  • Then it just loads the camera in that in that service and just allow you to use this box.

  • They are off creations directly in the device with that up already loaded.

  • So that's one of the best things about anything.

  • Is there?

  • Uh, is there the ability to make a stand alone APS with spark Air Studios was intended strictly for its pretending to shoot me for Facebook.

  • Yeah, you deployed directly to Instagram or fighting makes sense.

  • I mean, plenty of people use it, so it doesn't matter too much.

  • Cool.

  • All right, well, I'm excited to learn a little bit about it, cause I don't know almost anything about this.

  • Great.

  • Okay, so should we, don't you think?

  • Yeah.

  • Don't leave it.

  • Folks have any questions?

  • What?

  • We're doing this definitely post with the chat.

  • We'll take a look smelling games.

  • A terrible idea of it.

  • It will be killed by pull my finger jokes in a fortnight.

  • Pull my finger jokers.

  • Importance is Andre.

  • Maybe I wouldn't like that.

  • Be kinda green.

  • Yeah, So let's Yeah, let's let do something.

  • It's fine.

  • Just put me up.

  • So I'm just gonna quickly explain like what we're looking at here before before I start building anything in technical human features.

  • So this video always makes me laugh.

  • So there's a video is a stock video.

  • You see why the head's tilting and stuff in a minute?

  • But so what we're going to be focusing on is this spot, okay?

  • Are basically allows you to use both the front and rear facing camera in on a phone on.

  • Basically, how it does that is, um we use a message out, but for the front facing camera, or you're the one that's facing a face like the one that's being shown in this sword portal view window right now is this different things that it sort of has built in.

  • It has, like a face tracker toe like, perfectly sort of track the face in three D space.

  • It has a hand tracker on, then for the reverse camera.

  • So for the rear facing camera that faces off into the world, if you're gonna take a picture off something, it has a plane tracker so plain is basically any kind of surface.

  • On what?

  • Why that's important is because if you were to place an object into the world or at least make it appear to be in the world, then there needs to be a sort of stable tracking surface that the phone can sort of know the position off in orderto accurately place that digital asset into the physical environment.

  • So that's what really facing camera does.

  • Front facing camera is what we're gonna be looking at primarily today on specifically, we're gonna be looking at some of the face tracking and Facemash tools that built directly into spark.

  • Cool, Cool.

  • Somebody actually, a pretty good question.

  • I kind of suspected the Brit accent, thanks to the Siri's slasher movies.

  • But I can't distinguish between Scottish accent.

  • Do you have any tips for distinguishing between a Scottish in a British accent?

  • Um, no one gets a box in question.

  • You do.

  • What can you do?

  • It's gotta fact calling this one sort of.

  • I wonder if it's a stereotype.

  • Maybe the UK people can do each other's accents.

  • Yeah, we call it because the disguise accent is like it's definitely distinctive Internet It's kind of distinctive.

  • We have loads of different dialects in England that vary on region, even like Birmingham verses like Newcastle, which is that's a major.

  • That's a major one.

  • Does the book was Lucas Newcastle?