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  • six minutes from BBC learning english dot com.

  • Welcome to six minute grammar with me, Neil and make Catherine Hello.

  • In this program, we're looking at six different English tenses.

  • Andare first tense is the present simple.

  • So near a question.

  • Where do you live?

  • I live in London, and the present simple I Live tells us that this is a fact or a permanent situation.

  • London is home good aunt, as well as facts.

  • We use a present simple for regular activities to with phrases like every day or on Saturdays.

  • For example, we bring new six minute grammar on Tuesdays.

  • Indeed, and words like usually sometimes always and often go with the present simple.

  • He is Harry with an example.

  • Six minute grammar usually finishes with a quiz.

  • That's true.

  • It does.

  • On our second tense.

  • Is the present continuous?

  • Yes, and one of the uses off the present continuous tense is to talk about activities happening now.

  • His Harry with an example.

  • You're listening to six minute grammar right now.

  • That's an activity happening now, but here's a different example.

  • I'm from near Bristol, but I'm living in London at the moment, the present continuous I'm living tells us that this is a temporary situation.

  • London isn't Harry's permanent home with this use of the present continuous lookout for time expressions like at the moment this year these days and a sentence like I'm studying Russian this month doesn't mean I'm studying it right this minute.

  • It means I'm doing it often on around this time.

  • So far, so good but near.

  • If we use the present continuous tense for things happening now, why do we say things like I understand on DDE that coffee smells good?

  • That's happening now, but we used the present simple ah, good question.

  • And the answer is, some verbs don't take a continuous form.

  • They're often verbs of thinking or feeling like understand or smell or no believe.

  • Remember here, sound, want need.

  • We keep them in the simple tents.

  • Six minutes from BBC learning english dot com on.

  • We're talking about tenses now for tenses three and four.

  • That's the past simple and the present perfect andare examples air from a postcard that our colleague Finn centers and he's on holiday in India.

  • The lucky man So hurry.

  • Can you read it for us, please?

  • Hello from Goa.

  • Have you ever bean here We arrived two days ago.

  • It's been really hot since then.

  • I've already done some sun bathing, but we haven't seen much yet.

  • Lucky fin.

  • So let's look at the tenses.

  • The sentence we arrived two days ago is past simple.

  • Yes, use the past.

  • Simple.

  • When something clearly finished in the past, it often goes with phrases like two days ago yesterday and last month.

  • But with the present perfect, we don't usually say when things happened.

  • We just want to know whether something's happened or not.

  • So Finn's sentences I've already done some some bathing and we haven't seen much yet.

  • Are good examples of this exactly on the words already yet.

  • And just often go with the present perfect examples.

  • Please hurry.

  • Have you ever bean here?

  • It's been really hot since then with the present Perfect.

  • We're interested in past experiences Maur than past times or dates.

  • So we use ever and never have you ever bean to Goa, Catherine.

  • No, I've never bean to go any ill.

  • I'd like to, but I never have.

  • And if we need to talk about when things happened, we can use the words four and sense with the present Perfect.

  • So Finn's being in Goa for two days on Dhe.

  • It's bean really hot since he arrived now for our next tents.

  • And here's hurry with Maura of Finns Poles card.

  • We're going to visit the market tomorrow on we're coming home next Wednesday.

  • We use going to with an infinitive verb for things you plan or expect to happen.

  • Finn has a plan to visit the market tomorrow.

  • Yes, and Finn also says, We're coming home next Wednesday and that's tense.

  • Six.

  • The present continuous for future arrangements.

  • Yes, it's like going to, but it's a definite arrangement.

  • He's probably got his plane tickets, right?

  • So that's our six tenses.

  • And now it's quiz time.

  • Question one, Which is correct.

  • Is it?

  • Eh?

  • I'm needing some new shoes or B.

  • I need some new shoes.

  • It's B.

  • I need some new shoes question to which is correct.

  • Hey, did you see Luke since Saturday?

  • B.

  • Have you seen Luke since Saturday and it's B.

  • Have you seen Luke since Saturday on the last one, Which is correct?

  • Is it eh?

  • It's going to rain tomorrow, or B.

  • It's raining tomorrow.

  • It's a it's going to rain tomorrow.

  • Well done.

  • If you got those right, then that brings us to the end of the program.

  • There's more about this on our website at BBC learning english dot com Join us again for more six minute grammar.

  • Bye bye.

  • Huh?

six minutes from BBC learning english dot com.

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時制ツアー」に参加する - 6分間文法 (Take a 'tenses tour' - 6 Minute Grammar)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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