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  • Why are people hoarding toilet paper and hand sanitizer?

  • Why, why?

  • It's like we've decided we're going to play a game called Win the Pandemic and beat our neighbors at what's become a very disturbing game.

  • Why why are we doing this?

  • Actually, that question deserves an answer.

  • It's not merely rhetorical.

  • And today I want to address what it is that motivates people to take shelves that look like this perfectly fine shelves and turned them into shelves that look like this.

  • Some people might say We don't like each other.

  • That's the reason why we're hoarding goods.

  • We don't like each other so much.

  • We're so uncivil.

  • And we're so antagonistic toward our neighbors that we are willing to trample them on the way to clearing off shelves of toilet paper.

  • In fact, a lot of people attribute the problems many problems in society, including our response to the Corona virus to incivility, particularly in politics, name calling, conspiracy theories, demonizing the opposition, you name it, we've got it in an election year, which is already pretty nasty, and it's going to get worse today.

  • I want to suggest that the problem in our society and politics is not incivility.

  • Today, I'd like to make two points.

  • First, the problem is disconnection.

  • We are disconnected from each other, our neighbors, our communities and government.

  • And secondly, we can understand this problem a little bit better.

  • Bye.

  • Analogizing it to the rules of a game.

  • Now why is is this connection the answer to the problem rather than incivility?

  • It's because while uncivil people can be mean and rude, disconnected, people behaved selfishly.

  • Think about it like this.

  • It's Thanksgiving after your family has driven each other nuts.

  • Several arguments have broken out, and your significant other is no longer speaking to you.

  • It's time for dessert.

  • What prevents you from taking the A large piece of pie on the right and leaving that small sliver for your family and your friends?

  • It's the connection.

  • You're a member of a group.

  • What kind of a socio path takes all of the pie for himself, leaving on Lee the scraps for his family and his friends?

  • The different ways in which we respond to pumpkin pie and toilet paper illustrate a much documented problem in American society and politics.

  • It goes something like this.

  • The problems that we experience are the result of an increase in incivility, nastiness, caustic nous and aggression.

  • But here's the problem with that explanation.

  • American society has always been uncivil.

  • In fact, when this guy Alexis the Toqueville, visited the United States in 18 31 he found a people practicing what he called a vibrant democracy.

  • Now this is our idealized vision of what that vibrant democracy looks like.

  • But that's not what the Toqueville found.

  • He found a people practicing a politics that was nasty, vitriolic and malicious.

  • It was so nasty that even George Washington was not insulated from abuse.

  • By the way, you may remember from the play Hamilton that these are the words that got Charles Lee shot by John Lawrence in a duel.

  • Politics then looked very much like politics.

  • Now, saying our politics is uncivil doesn't really explain what's different.

  • So what is different?

  • What has changed In the 18 hundreds, Americans got when, when Americans got done abusing and maligning each other, they went to church.

  • Together.

  • They played baseball together.

  • They ate dinner together without much thought to political differences, and their Children married each other.

  • People connected their interests with the interests of the whole and those interests surmounted any political differences.

  • The Toqueville called this civic virtue.

  • So what's different today?

  • Unlike in 18 31 Americans today feel disconnected from each other, from their communities and from their government.

  • We have to put it into Tokyo's terms, much less civic virtue.

  • The documented process looks like this.

  • As affluence grows and people acquire much more money and resource is, they become individualistic and self involved and self involved.

  • People become disassociated.

  • They become so disassociated because they cannot stand to be around people who think differently than they do.

  • Generally, people have two responses to this kind of society.

  • The first response is to, uh, move into private of sort, sort yourself into private of like minded others who associate only with people who think like you do.

  • The problem with that is we end up having a conversation with our fellow.

  • We end up having very limited relationship that don't challenge.

  • They don't expand the mind the they don't create the potential for new ideas.

  • The other response, uh, well and also different may result in fury directed at out group at people who don't think like you do.

  • The other responds is a little different.

  • Many people didn't sort themselves in the tribe.

  • They went home, and they turned on Netflix.

  • Study after study correlate increased wealth and affluence in Western democracies with a range of pathologies like social disconnectedness, loneliness, declining civic participation and a lack of trust in government.

  • This connectedness and social isolation correspond with the Klein and empathy for others.

  • A rise in emotional distress.

  • Elation decline in ah ah, attachment to government.

  • It includes anxiety, narcissism and a range of psycho pathologies and neuroscience.

  • I want to offer a different way of thinking that might help us break out of the social isolation in tow.

  • End the silos of similar opinion into which we have warehoused our brain.

  • Let us think for a moment of of society as a game.

  • Think of your connections to society, to your friends, your family, your neighbors and community and government as a game.

  • What are the rules of this game?

  • There are two things to know.

  • First of all, there are generally two types of games.

  • Secondly, you may be thinking you're playing one game, but you're actually playing another.

  • You could be wrong about what game you are playing.

  • So what are these who type of game?

  • Well, the first is called a collective game.

  • A collective game is in 11 in which you play as a group you cannot win unless the group win.

  • An example of This is Dungeons and Dragons or World of Warcraft.

  • Ah, the other type of game is called a zero thumb or one winner game.

  • This is a game in which you win and you can only win if everyone else loses.

  • An example of this type of game is monopoly.

  • There are also in between game I I will admit to that there are in between games.

  • There are games where somebody is goingto win, but nobody really cares who does it.

  • The group experience the connection with others that matters the most and an example of an in between game would be cards against humanity.

  • So what game are you playing?

  • The civic minded people in society are playing Dungeons and dragons.

  • They are connected with others.

  • They have connected their goals with the goals of a group.

  • The disassociated private.

  • They're playing monopoly.

  • They have to win, and ever they cannot win unless everyone else loses the socially isolated have stopped playing altogether.

  • Um, I freely admit that no game is perfect in every single game.

  • Uh, has there has a problem?

  • Just because you're playing a collective game doesn't mean that you win.

  • There are some game where collective games in particular, where to win.

  • You can't just simply focus on the goal that the group must have.

  • Steve, you have to convince members within the group not to exploit.

  • Common resource is and, ah, and take advantage of other members by acting badly.

  • You're selfishly, here's an example of that.

  • Does anybody remember Leroy Jenkins?

  • If you haven't heard of this, go look at it added on YouTube.

  • A group of people playing World of Warcraft are attempting to go through a set of doors.

  • They know.

  • On the other side of those doors there are monsters.

  • They are attempting to coordinate their activities when one of their members decides to go rogue, yells his name out and goes in through the doors and into the room.

  • The rest of the group doesn't know what to do.

  • They follow him in and everyone dive.

  • Everyone loses.

  • Now that was a setup, as we know now, it was.

  • It was a set up, but it's a very good illustration of what happens when a member of a group behaves badly.

  • Um, a society society is a collective game.

  • By definition.

  • If you are a member of a society, you're playing at collective Game.

  • But for some reason we often missed eight that game for a zero sum game, for example, that moment when you realize you weren't playing a zero sum game, this individual recounted on Facebook and instance in which he an interviewer, was standing on a subway and a man brushed by him and then told him to go f himself.

  • A little later, that man showed up for his interview with the man he had just passed out on the on the subway.

  • It got a little tense when he asked him how his commute was.

  • This individual thought he was playing a zero sum game, but he was actually playing a collective game where he needed a job and the interviewer needed to hire someone and everyone lost because he mistook with game he was playing.

  • Now the problem with zero sum games is this.

  • It's hard to identify the bad actor it's hard to identify the bad actor.

  • For example, these three people represent a society, but it's one in with a powerful actor who controls most of the resource is.

  • It has convinced the other two members that they need to play a zero sum game for control of the stairs.

  • Three sources that remained to them.

  • The same situation exists here.

  • These two individuals are traveling on an airline.

  • A woman documented this, uh on Instagram the lean, her seat back into the private face of the individual sitting behind her, and the man sitting behind her proceeded to punch the back of her care throughout the rest of her flight.

  • Now who is the bad actor here?

  • Who's the bad actor?

  • Is it the man punching the thief?

  • Or is it the woman who has leaned her care back into the personal space of an individual s so that he can travel comfortably?

  • It's neither it's the airline, but unfortunately, these two individuals are so interested in and pointing the finger at each other and assigning blame that they've missed who the bad actor is.

  • On the other hand, think about this.

  • The N B A season is canceled.

  • March Madness is cancelled, Head has been moved to July, and I am speaking to a room full of empty chairs.

  • These were decision made by people who had millions of dollars to lose, and they decided that they were playing a collective game.

  • If they had played the zero sum game and held the N V a ah season and held March madness, there would have been at a severe price to pay for the collective.

  • They would have made their millions, but the collective would have lost.

  • So they are the good actors.

  • They made those decisions as good actors for the benefit of the collective.

  • So what is the upshot of all this?

  • Well, first of all, society stands a better chance of surviving.

  • If all of the members of that society believe that they are playing a collective game, they can focus on a steaming the goals of the group while controlling the behavior of the members and identifying who is the bad actor.

  • On the other hand, the society where individuals think they're playing a zero sum game is less likely to survive because the individuals are so interested in competing with each other that they missed who the bad actor is, who is exploiting them.

  • So stop worrying about incivility and start worrying about connecting.

  • Stop, start playing the collective game and stop playing the zero sum game.

  • If you play the collective game and we all play it together, we can stay with a great deal of credibility to the bad actor.

  • You may be exploiting your position for your personal gain, but we are coming for you.

  • Thank you for your time.

Why are people hoarding toilet paper and hand sanitizer?

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なぜ人々はトイレットペーパーをため込むのか?| ハンス・ハッカー|TEDxUAMonticello (Why are people hoarding toilet paper? | Hans Hacker | TEDxUAMonticello)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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