Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • There are over 1500 talks on TED.com and there are over 25,000 TEDx talks online.

  • And you know, people can watch these at home,

  • in their pyjamas, at their leisure, whenever they feel like it.

  • So you kind of wonder:

  • why would anyone come to any of our events?

  • I think that the answer to that is: Experience.

  • I think the experience we provide is really important.

  • You know, people connecting around the power of ideas

  • and so what this says, to me and to all of us,

  • is that we really need to put as much time and effort

  • into thinking about what that experience is

  • as we do into curating the speaker program.

  • For me, it's always been a key piece of TED - experience planning,

  • but it really hit home when,

  • in 2008, we decided to do what ultimately became TEDActive.

  • It was a simulcast event that we had in Aspen.

  • And so, you know, we really had to look at it and think

  • what do you do so that we are not just...

  • - It was 300 people at that time - what do we do so we're not

  • 300 people sitting in a room watching television together?

  • And these people paid a few thousand bucks to be there by the way, right?!

  • So, we really thought about, you know, putting some great exhibits in,

  • and thinking about ways that people can connect to the event.

  • Well, the plan was great and then... we got there.

  • And we had a little... mere disaster.

  • Someone on the AV team hung a projector really close to a sprinkler head

  • and the fire alarm went off.

  • What you are looking at here is our disaster,

  • you know, is raining down on all of our equipment.

  • This is less then 48 hours before the event started.

  • You see our couches and our plush chairs and blankets and our equipment,

  • and all of our electrical stuff - that's all there,

  • it's all getting rained on.

  • And so... it was amazing, so, also (Laughter)

  • we had some kind of...

  • didn't really think the whole thing through quite well enough.

  • We had 3 staffers! 3 TED staffers at TEDActive in 2008,

  • for 300 attendees.

  • So, attendees were showing up.

  • The registration was right outside of where you are seeing all this water.

  • They were showing up to register and it was super loud, fire alarm was going off...

  • and they were like: "OK, how can we help?"

  • And we said: "You know what?

  • Can you run to the gym and grab all the towels you can find?"

  • "Can you get some hair dryers? Can you pick up this mop and help us?"

  • And it kind of set the tone for the week. And what we found then

  • was that all the people that had helped out, and pitched in,

  • kind of wanted to do that the rest of the week.

  • And that inspired others to pitch in.

  • And then, the truly amazing thing was that everyone who did pitch in

  • had a fantastic time! They loved it! We got help! It was amazing!

  • And it created this incredible sense of community.

  • And that's when I realized, you know,

  • that community was the most important asset that we have.

  • And we all have that asset, every person in here.

  • And it's free and it's

  • I think really fun to think about all the things we can do with that.

  • And we learn so much from you all and all things that you do with your communities.

  • It's, really cool. And I think that's something,

  • everytime we have a TED event, we really, really think about

  • where can we connect with people and how can we connect them with each other.

  • And that's from the e-mails that go out after you register.

  • This is an e-mail that we sent leading up to TEDActive, every week.

  • This is one where we introduced everybody to the people

  • who were like the host of the event.

  • You'll see people here at TEDGlobal with a tag on their name badge.

  • They are here to help people, first timers, find their way around.

  • It's fun to get them connecting online.

  • There is a TEDGlobal 2013 Facebook group.

  • We do that at TEDActive, too.

  • So, later on, in this newsletter that you see here, but it is not pictured,

  • we talked about some of the stuff people were talking about online.

  • And it helps to get people engaged.

  • And then, down to how you walk out of the events...

  • this is Jessy Arrington at TEDActive a couple of years ago.

  • The whole thing was over,

  • we were walking out to our party and she brought rainbow colored hats

  • and everybody wore solid coloured shirts and we walked out

  • after a marching band and rainbow colours to our farewell party.

  • We also like to put together places were people can make stuff.

  • It helps introverts connect really well actually,

  • because for some people it's really hard to walk up and introduce yourself,

  • but they still want to be talking to people.

  • So a great way to engage them is to allow people to sit down and make stuff,

  • and feel creative and be creative.

  • And then, that has this incredible benefit too,

  • of giving you fantastic artwork for your event,

  • that's been created by the community that everyone feels really proud of too.

  • So that's the sculpture that these people were contributing to.

  • That was at TEDActive this year. The artist is Grace Hawthorne.

  • And we also had this artist Kyle Johnson, who brought materials to make flags.

  • And everybody could make a flag that sort of represented their personality.

  • So if you look at it, it created this beautiful sort of landscape

  • of artwork representing all the people at TEDActive out there.

  • And it looks great as a whole, but what's really awesome

  • is that you go up to each one of those very different flags,

  • and that represents a different personality of someone who is there,

  • which is really fun.

  • But, you guys are doing these things too

  • and TEDxManhattan did something I think is great:

  • you don't have as long to get people to connect.

  • They had a family style lunch, people were passing dishes.

  • It feels like, how can that not be intimate, right?

  • How can you not get to know the people you are sitting next to?

  • TEDxSingapore had do-it-yourself name badges.

  • People made name badges that,

  • not only said words that represented them,

  • but visually represented them as well.

  • It was pretty cool.

  • There is another asset that we all have, all of us,

  • that I think also contributes to experience

  • and that's space - event space.

  • It's stage design, it is like the flow of a room,

  • thinking about all of these elements really add to the experience.

  • Thinking about the ideas that are inspired by the space that you choose.

  • TEDxUbud. Look at that!

  • It's a bamboo pavilion, then they got bamboo mats out there.

  • I'm dying to crawl into that picture and sit on one.

  • And they have flowers for their TEDx logo.

  • TEDxAlmedalen in Sweden.

  • What I love about what they did is it's a really simple set up, right?

  • The idea behind this: it's at midnight!

  • They had their TEDx at midnight outside! You don't need much.

  • TEDxLaçador:

  • they decide to use their environment to put their attendees in a cage -

  • (Laughter) - Not sure what's going on with that one.

  • But actually it was on a farm and they let them roam free.

  • A beautiful farm that created a good experience for everyone who was there.

  • And I'm sure it really formed the event too.

  • At TEDxRio+20 they built a venue

  • and the spectacular thing about that too is that every piece of that -

  • Look at the size of that! Every piece of that was reusable ladder,

  • when it was taken down.

  • Stage design is also important and it's something that

  • we really care about and we love to see what you all come up with

  • because it also impacts the videos that we see in the end,

  • so it's really important to think about it.

  • TEDxEdmonton is known around the office for their fantastic stage design,

  • we love different stages they've turned out.

  • I think this one from TEDxMidAtlantic is really wonderfull.

  • It's so simple - bookshelves, with special books on the stage.

  • That's something that is easily achievable,

  • but really well thought out too.

  • I think, this one, from TEDxCairo,

  • is really nice and just shows the power of lighting.

  • You know, that's lighting to create ambience.

  • And then, there is a third thing that I think we all have in common

  • with what we do and that is this massive passion.

  • The love and what this allows us to contribute to each event

  • is the kind of ideas that don't relate to anything else but just

  • "Wouldn't it be cool if...?!"

  • And so, TEDxSanna said,

  • "Wouldn't it be cool if we could put our logo

  • on a mountain side and you could see it from Google Earth?"

  • Yeah, that's good work!

  • TEDxSanaa, right?!

  • In Yemen.

  • TEDxKids@Chiyoda in Tokio

  • decided to do an audition event for kids!

  • Fantastic!

  • A lot of you guys know about the cupcake love website

  • on the page on Facebook with people who just made TEDx cupcakes.

  • And what I think is amazing is how many of you all

  • contributed cupcakes to that.

  • Who has in here?

  • Oh, that's pretty great!

  • Then in TEDxDetroit, every year they gather their attendees outside

  • and make a big X and take a photo of the attendees.

  • Which I think is fun.

  • So, I'm going to end this with another disaster story.

  • (Laughter)

  • Because I love those and I've had a few of them

  • and I know lot of you have had a few of them too.

  • But this is one where all of those three components

  • ended up coming together,

  • to not only save the day,

  • but actually provide an incredible experience for people who were there.

  • Last year, we did a series of talent search events.

  • We did one in Sao Paulo, Brazil and we had this horrible thing happen

  • there was a weird power problem

  • and we lost power a few times, for accumulative 3 hours.

  • So, I was co-hosting it with Rodrigo Cunha,

  • and we had to kind of fill the time,

  • because we had all these speakers who'd worked so hard on their talks,

  • and we really owed it to them to keep the audience there.

  • We had no idea actually how long it was gonna take,

  • but we knew we had to go to plan Z.

  • We had to really do something right?!

  • So, we started trying to get people up on stage and it was not easy...

  • First actually, the space thing really helped us out

  • because the way they had planned their space

  • was that there was a main theater and then also a simulcast area.

  • So we did loose some people over time.

  • The event was due to end at 9pm and it ended up at ending at midnight,

  • so it was quite late.

  • And we lost a few people, but you could not feel it in the room at all.

  • Every single seat in the theater stayed packed until the end

  • because of that simulcast area.

  • Everyone was able to stand there and watch live

  • and that really made a difference.

  • The other thing, we just looked around and said,

  • "OK, what do we have? We don't have power, it's late at night,

  • we have nothing, we've got iPhones with flashlights on, and much people.

  • So, we started getting them up and trying to get stories out of them.

  • We sort of figured out how to do that

  • and had people come up and do stuff and it was a little hard

  • and then people started to come up and sing and do talents and stuff.

  • And what you see here is these 3 women getting on stage, leading us all in a song

  • and the only reason you're seeing it lit at all is because of the camera's flash,

  • but there are 2 of us holding iPhone flashlights up on them,

  • and it turned into this totally magical thing.

  • And one of our speakers actually

  • gave a marriage proposal from the stage at the end. (Cheering)

  • It was pretty incredible. And it was also the passion of the team there

  • that help everyone go

  • like for a second there were moments when everyone thought,

  • "What we are going to do, this is horrible", but then,

  • because everyone loved what they were doing so much,

  • they pretty quickly went to: "Ok, what's the opportunity here,

  • how do we make this great?"

  • So, I guess I just want to end this with,

  • all of this makes me really think,

  • we all need to look at our events,

  • every single logistical piece, everything we ever do and arrange,

  • every piece of it, e-mails, all of it,

  • and think, "What is the experience here?

  • Why not make it extraordinary?"

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

There are over 1500 talks on TED.com and there are over 25,000 TEDx talks online.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級

TEDx】TEDとTEDxのコミュニティの作り方。TEDGlobal 2013でのケリー・ストエッツェル (【TEDx】How TED and TEDx communities are built: Kelly Stoetzel at TEDGlobal 2013)

  • 273 28
    阿多賓 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日