Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • If you're wondering

    もしあなたが疑問に思っているなら

  • this is how the most revolutionary course in biology of all time begins.

    ここから生物学史上最も革命的なコースが始まります。

  • Come today to learn about covalent and ionic and hydrogen bonds

    今日は共有結合とイオン結合、水素結合について学びに来てください。

  • What about electron orbitals

    電子軌道はどうなっているのか

  • and the octet rule

    とオクテットルール

  • and what does it all have to do with a mad man named Gilbert Lewis?

    ギルバート・ルイスという狂人と何の関係があるんだ?

  • It's all contained within.

    すべてはこの中に含まれています。

  • Hello, I’m Hank

    こんにちは、私はハンクです。

  • I assume youre here because youre interested in biology

    生物学に興味があるから ここに来たんだろ?

  • and if you are, that makes sense because

    もしそうなら、それは理にかなっている

  • like any good 50 Cent song, biology is just about sex and not dying.

    50セントの歌のように、生物学はセックスのことであり、死なないことだ。

  • Everyone watching this should be interested in sex and not dying

    これを見ている人はみんなセックスに興味があって死なないように

  • being that you are, I assume, a human being.

    あなたが人間であることを前提にしています。

  • I'm going to be teaching this biology course differently than most courses you've ever

    私はこの生物学の授業を今までの授業とは違ったものにしようと思っています。

  • taken in your life

    蟄居

  • For example, I'm not going to spend the first class

    例えば、私はファーストクラスを使うつもりはありません。

  • talking about how I’m going to spend the rest of class.

    授業の残りの時間をどう過ごすかを話しています。

  • I'm just going to start teaching you, like right about now.

    今から教えてあげようと思っています。

  • I may say one more thing before I start teaching.

    教える前にもう一つ言うかもしれません。

  • Yes, I am going to!

    はい、行ってきます!

  • It's that: if I’m going too fast for you, the great thing about YouTube is

    それは:もし私があなたのためにあまりにも速く行くならば、YouTubeの素晴らしいところは

  • that you can just rewind.

    巻き戻せばいいだけの話。

  • Watch stuff over and over again if it's confusing.

    それが混乱している場合は、何度も何度も何度も見てください。

  • Hopefully, it will become less confusing.

    うまくいけば、混乱が少なくなるでしょう。

  • And you're even allowed to fast forward through the bits that you already know.

    そして、あなたがすでに知っている部分を早送りすることさえ許されています。

  • Another tip, you can actually even use the number keys on your keyboard to move around

    もう一つのヒントは、あなたも実際に移動するには、キーボードの数字キーを使用することができます。

  • in the video.

    を動画で紹介しています。

  • And I promise, you can do this to me as much as you want and I'm totally not going to mind.

    約束するよ、好きなだけやってくれて構わないし、気にしないよ。

  • A great professor of mine once told me that in order to really understand any topic

    以前、私の偉大な教授が言っていたのですが、どんなテーマでも本当に理解するためには

  • you have to understand a little bit of the level of complexity just below that topic.

    その話題のすぐ下にある複雑さのレベルを少しは理解する必要があります。

  • The level of complexity just below biology is chemistry

    生物学のすぐ下の複雑さのレベルが化学

  • unless you're a biochemist in which case you would argue that it's biochemistry.

    あなたが生化学者でない限り、あなたはそれが生化学であることを主張するでしょう。

  • Either way, we're gonna have to know a little bit of chemistry in order to get through biology.

    どちらにしても、生物学を学ぶためには化学の知識が必要になります。

  • And so THAT, my friends, is where we're going to start.

    それが、これから始めようとしていることです。

  • I am a collection of organic molecules called Hank Green.

    私はハンク・グリーンという有機分子の集まりです。

  • Organic compounds are a class of compounds that contain carbon.

    有機化合物とは、炭素を含む化合物の一種である。

  • And carbon is this sexy little minx on the periodic table

    そして炭素は周期表のセクシーな ミンクスです

  • that's, you know...

    その

  • disinterested in monogamy.

    一夫一婦制に興味がない

  • A jezebel. Bit of a tramp. Hussy.

    嫉妬深いちょっとした浮浪者ヤリマン

  • When I say carbon is small I mean that it's actually

    炭素が小さいというと、実際には

  • as an atom, it's a relatively small atom.

    原子としては、比較的小さな原子です。

  • It has 6 protons and 6 neutrons for a total atomic weight of 12.

    6個の陽子と6個の中性子を持ち、総原子量は12です。

  • Because of that, carbon doesn't take up a lot of space.

    そのため、カーボンは場所を取らないのです。

  • And so carbon can form itself into weird rings, and sheets and spirals

    炭素はそれ自身で奇妙なリングやシートやスパイラルを形成することができます

  • and double and even triple bonds.

    と二重債、さらには三重債まである。

  • It can do all sorts of things that could never be accomplished by more bulky atoms.

    もっとかさばる原子では決してできないことを、あらゆる種類のことができます。

  • It's basically, your atomic equivalent of an olympic gymnast.

    基本的には、オリンピックの体操選手に相当する、あなたの原子に相当するものです。

  • It can only do all of those wonderful, beautiful, elegant things because it's kind of tiny.

    それは、それが小さなものだからこそ、それらの素晴らしい、美しい、エレガントなすべてのことを行うことができます。

  • It's also said that carbon is kind

    それはまた、炭素は親切であると言われています。

  • and that's an interesting sort of thing to say about an atom.

    と言うのは、原子のことを言っているようで面白いですね。

  • It's not like some other elements that are just

    それは、他のいくつかの要素とは違って

  • desperately trying to do anything they can

    必死になってなんとかしようとしている

  • to fill up their electron orbitals.

    の電子軌道を埋めるために。

  • No, carbon knows what it's like to be alone, and so it's not all

    いいえ、炭素はそれが一人でいるようなものを知っているので、それはすべてではありません。

  • Please! I'll do anything for your electrons!”

    "お願い!あなたの電子のためなら何でもします!"

  • needy like fluorine or chlorine or sodium is.

    フッ素や塩素、ナトリウムのように必要なものはありません。

  • Elements like chlorine if you breath them in they like literally tear up your insides

    塩素のような元素は、あなたがそれらを呼吸する場合、彼らは文字通りあなたの内側を引き裂くようなものです。

  • and sodium, sodium is insane if you put it in water it explodes!

    とナトリウム、ナトリウムは、あなたがそれを水に入れた場合、それが爆発すると、それは正気ではありません

  • Carbon though...

    カーボンなのに...

  • Meh.

    メフ

  • It wants more electrons, but it's not gonna kill to get them.

    もっと電子を欲しがっているが、それを手に入れるために殺すつもりはない。

  • It makes and breaks bonds like a 13-year old mall rat.

    それは13歳のモールラットのように債券を作ったり壊したりします。

  • And it doesn't even hold a grudge.

    そして、それは恨みさえ持たない。

  • Carbon is also, as I mentioned before, a bit of a tramp, because, it needs four extra electrons

    炭素はまた、前にも述べたように、ちょっとした不器用さがあります、なぜならば、4つの余分な電子が必要だからです。

  • and so it'll bond with pretty much whoever happens to be nearby

    そして、それはかなりの人が近くにあることを起こると結合します。

  • And also because it needs four electrons, it'll bond with two, or three

    また、それは4つの電子を必要とするので、それは2つまたは3つと結合します。

  • or even four of those things at the same time

    或は四つのことを同時に行うことも

  • And carbon is willing and interested to bond with lots of different molecules

    そして、炭素は多くの異なる分子と結合することに意欲的であり、興味を持っています。

  • like hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, nitrogen

    水素、酸素、リン、窒素

  • or to other molecules of carbon.

    または炭素の他の分子に

  • It can do this in infinite configurations

    それは無限の構成でこれを行うことができます。

  • allowing it to be the core atom of complicated structures that make living things like ourselves

    躰の核となる原子であることを許す

  • because carbon is this perfect mix of small, kind, and a little bit trampy

    カーボンは、小さくて優しくて、ちょっとトランピーな感じの完璧なミックスだから。

  • life is entirely based on this element.

    人生はすべてこの要素に基づいています。

  • Carbon is the foundation of biology.

    炭素は生物学の基礎です。

  • It's so fundamental that scientists have a pretty difficult time

    科学者がかなり困難な時間を持っているように、それは非常に基本的なものです

  • even conceiving of life that isn't based on carbon.

    炭素をベースにしていない生命を考えても

  • Life is only possible on earth because carbon is always floating around in our atmosphere

    大気中には常に炭素が浮かんでいるからこそ、地球上では生命が存在するのです。

  • in the form of carbon dioxide.

    二酸化炭素の形で。

  • So it's important to note, when I talk about carbon bonding with other elements

    だからそれは、私は他の要素との炭素結合の話をするときに、注意することが重要です。

  • I'm not actually talking about sex, it's just a useful analogy.

    私は実際にはセックスの話をしているわけではありません。

  • Carbon, on it's own, is an atom with 6 protons, 6 neutrons, and 6 electrons.

    炭素は、それ自体が6つの陽子、6つの中性子、6つの電子を持つ原子です。

  • Atoms, have electron shells, and they need to have these shells filled

    原子は、電子の殻を持っていて、これらの殻が満たされている必要があります。

  • in order to be happy, fulfilled atoms.

    幸せで充実した原子になるために

  • So carbon, has 6 total electrons, 2 for the first shell

    炭素は6個の電子を持っていて 最初の殻には2個の電子を持っています

  • so it's totally happy

    だからそれは完全に幸せだ

  • and 4 of the 8 it needs to fill the second shell.

    と8のうち4つは2つ目のシェルを埋める必要があります。

  • Carbon forms a type of bond that we call covalent.

    炭素は共有結合と呼ばれる結合の一種を形成しています。

  • This is when atoms actually are sharing electrons with each other.

    これは、原子が実際にお互いに電子を共有している場合です。

  • So in the case of methane, which is pretty much the simplest carbon compound ever.

    メタンの場合は今までで最も単純な炭素化合物ですが

  • Carbon is sharing it's 4 electrons, in it's outer electron shell, with 4 atoms of hydrogen.

    炭素は、その外側の電子シェルの中で、4つの電子を水素の4つの原子と共有しています。

  • Hydrogen atoms only have 1 electron, so they want their first S orbital filled.

    水素原子は電子が1個しかないので、最初のS軌道を埋めようとします。

  • Carbon shares its 4 electrons with those 4 hydrogens

    炭素は4つの電子と4つの水素を共有しています。

  • and those 4 hydrogens each share 1 electron with carbon.

    4つの水素はそれぞれ1つの電子を炭素と共有しています。

  • So everybody's happy.

    だからみんな幸せなんだよ。

  • In chemistry and biology this is often represented by what we call Lewis dot structures.

    化学や生物学では、これをルイスドット構造と呼んでいます。

  • Good lord, I'm in a chair!

    椅子に座ってるんだ!

  • I'm in a chair and there's a book.

    私は椅子に座っていて、そこには本があります。

  • Apparently I have something to tell you that's in this book.

    どうやらこの本に書いてあることをお伝えしたいことがあるようです。

  • Which is a book called Lewis: Acids and Bases.

    ルイスという本はどれだ酸と塩基です

  • By Hank Green

    ハンク・グリーンによって

  • Gilbert Lewis, the guy who thought up Lewis dot structures

    ルイスのドット構造を考えたギルバート・ルイス

  • was also the guy behind Lewis Acids and Bases

    は、ルイスの酸と塩基を開発した人でもあります。

  • and he was nominated for the nobel prize

    と、ノーベル賞にノミネートされています。

  • 35 times.

    35回です。

  • This is more nominations than anyone else ever in history.

    これは歴史上誰よりもノミネートされています。

  • And the number of times he won was roughly the same number of times

    そして、当選回数も大体同じくらいの回数で

  • that everyone else in the world has won.

    世界中のみんなが勝ったことを

  • Which is zero.

    どっちがゼロなんだ?

  • Lewis disliked this a great deal.

    ルイスはこれを大いに嫌っていた。

  • It's kind of like a baseball player having more hits than any other player in history

    それは、野球選手が歴史上のどの選手よりも多くの安打を打っているようなものです。

  • and no home runs.

    とホームランが出ない。

  • He may have been the most influential chemist of all time.

    彼は史上最も影響力のある化学者だったかもしれません。

  • He coined the term photon, he revolutionized how we think about acids and bases

    彼は光子という言葉を作り、酸と塩基の考え方に革命を起こしました。

  • and he produced the first molecule of heavy water.

    と言って、重水の最初の分子を作ったのです。

  • He was the first person to conceptualize the covalent bond that we're talking about right

    彼は、私たちが話している共有結合を概念化した最初の人です。

  • now.

    今すぐに

  • Gilbert Lewis died alone in his laboratory while working on cyanide compounds

    ギルバート・ルイスは、シアン化合物に取り組んでいる間、彼の研究室で一人で死んだ。

  • after having had lunch with a younger, more charismatic colleague

    後輩のカリスマと食事をした後に

  • who had won the Nobel Prize and who had worked on the Manhattan project.

    ノーベル賞を受賞した人で、マンハッタン計画に取り組んでいた人。

  • Many suspect that he killed himself with the cyanide compounds he was working on

    多くの人は、彼が研究していたシアン化合物で自殺したと疑っています。

  • but the medical examiner said heart attack, without really looking into it.

    と言っていたのですが、検視官は本当に調べずに心臓発作と言っていました。

  • I told you all of that because

    それを全部話したのは

  • the little Lewis dot structure that we use to represent how atoms bond to each other

    原子同士がどのように結合しているかを表すのに使う小さなルイスドット構造

  • is something that was created by a troubled mad genius.

    は、困ったキチガイ天才が作ったものです。

  • It's not some abstract scientific thing that's always existed.

    それは、常に存在している抽象的な科学的なものではありません。

  • It's a tool that was thought up by a guy

    ある人が考え出したツールです。

  • and it was so useful that we've been using it ever since.

    それはとても便利なものだったので、それ以来ずっと使っています。

  • In biology most compounds can be displayed in Lewis dot structure form

    生物学では、ほとんどの化合物はルイスドット構造の形態で表示することができます。

  • and here's how that works:

    で、その仕組みを説明します。

  • These structures basically show how atoms bond together to make up molecules.

    これらの構造は、基本的には原子がどのように結合して分子を構成しているかを示しています。

  • And one of the rules of thumb when you're making these diagrams

    そして、これらの図を作成するときの経験則の1つは

  • is that the elements that we're working with here react with one another in such a way

    は、私たちがここで作業している要素が、そのような方法でお互いに反応するということです。

  • that each atom ends up with 8 electrons in it's outermost shell.

    各原子は、それの最外殻に8個の電子で終わること。

  • That is called the Octet Rule.

    これをオクテットルールと呼びます。

  • Because atoms want to complete their octets of electrons to be happy and satisfied.

    なぜなら、原子は幸せで満足するために電子のオクテットを完成させたいと思っているからです。

  • Oxygen has 6 electrons in it's octet and needs 2 which is why we get H2O

    酸素はそれのオクテットに6電子を持っており、我々はH2Oを得る理由である2を必要としています。

  • It can also bond with carbon

    また、炭素と結合することができます。

  • which needs 4.

    4を必要とする。

  • So you get 2 double bonds to 2 different oxygen atoms and you end up with CO2.

    2つの異なる酸素原子に2つの二重結合ができ、最終的にはCO2になります。

  • That pesky global warming gas and also the stuff that makes all life on Earth possible.

    その厄介な地球温暖化ガスと、地球上のすべての生命を可能にするもの。

  • Nitrogen has 5 electrons in its outer shell. Here's how we count them:

    窒素は外殻に5個の電子を持っています。その数を数えてみましょう。

  • There are 4 placeholders. Each of them wants 2 atoms.

    4つのプレースホルダがあります。それぞれが2つの原子を欲しがっています。

  • And like people getting on a bus they prefer to start out not sitting next to each other.

    そして、バスに乗る人たちのように、最初は隣り合わせに座らないことを好む。

  • I'm not kidding about this, they really don't double up until they have to.

    私はこれについて冗談ではなく、彼らは本当に彼らが必要とするまでダブルアップしません。

  • So for maximum happiness, nitrogen bonds with 3 hydrogens, forming ammonia.

    だから最大の幸福のために、窒素は3つの水素と結合し、アンモニアを形成する。

  • Or with 2 hydrogens sticking off another group of atoms, which we call an amino group.

    あるいは、2つの水素が別の原子群から離れてくっついていて、それをアミノ基と呼んでいます。

  • And if that amino group is bonded to a carbon that is bonded to a carboxylic acid group

    そして、そのアミノ基がカルボン酸基と結合している炭素に結合していると

  • then you have

    そうすれば

  • an amino acid!

    アミノ酸

  • You've heard of those, right?

    聞いたことありますよね?

  • Sometimes electrons are shared equally within a covalent bond like with O2.

    O2のように共有結合の中で電子が均等に共有されることもあります。

  • That's called a non-polar covalent bond. But often one of the participants is more greedy.

    それは非極性共有結合と呼ばれるものです。しかし、多くの場合、参加者のどちらかがより貪欲になっています。

  • In water for example, the oxygen molecule sucks the electrons in

    例えば水の中では、酸素分子が電子を吸引して

  • and they spend more time with the oxygen than with the hydrogens.

    そして、彼らは水素よりも酸素と一緒にいる時間の方が長いのです。

  • This creates a slight positive charge around the hydrogens

    これにより、水素の周りにわずかな正電荷が発生します。

  • and a slight negative charge around the oxygen.

    と酸素の周りにわずかに負の電荷を持っています。

  • When something has a charge we say that it's polar. It has a positive and negative pole.

    何かが電荷を持っているとき、私たちはそれが極であると言います。正極と負極があります。

  • And so it's a polar covalent bond.

    そして、それは極性の共有結合です。

  • Now let's talk for a moment about a completely different type of bond, which is an ionic

    では、イオン性の結合である全く異なるタイプの結合について少しお話しましょう。

  • bond.

    絆。

  • And that's when, instead of sharing electrons

    それは、電子を共有する代わりに

  • atoms just completely wholeheartedly donate or accept an electron from another atom

    原子が一心不乱に電子を出し入れする

  • and then live happily as a charged atom.

    そして、電荷を帯びた原子として幸せに生きる。

  • And there is actually no such thing as a charged atom.

    そして、実際には荷電した原子など存在しません。

  • If an atom has a charge, it's an ion.

    原子が電荷を持っていれば、それはイオンです。

  • Atoms in general prefer to be neutral, but compared with having a full octet, it's not

    原子は一般的に中性であることを好むが、フルオクテットを持つことに比べれば、それは

  • that big of a deal.

    大したことじゃない

  • Just like we often choose between being emotionally balanced and sexually satisfied

    私たちはしばしば感情的にバランスのとれた、性的に満足していることの間で選択するのと同じように

  • atoms will sometimes make sacrifices for that octet.

    原子はそのオクテットのために犠牲になることがあります。

  • The most common ionic compound in our daily lives is salt.

    私たちの生活の中で最も一般的なイオン性化合物は塩です。

  • Sodium chloride. NaCl.

    塩化ナトリウムNaCl

  • The stuff, despite it's deliciousness, as I mentioned previously

    前にも述べたように、美味しさにもかかわらず、スタッフは

  • is made up of two really nasty chemicals. Sodium and chlorine.

    2つの厄介な化学物質でできています。ナトリウムと塩素です

  • Chlorine is what we call a halogen, which is an element that only needs one electron

    塩素はハロゲンと呼ばれるもので、電子が1つしかない元素です。

  • to fulfill it's octet.

    のオクテットを満たすために。

  • And sodium is an alkaline metal which means that it only has one electron in it's octet.

    そして、ナトリウムはアルカリ金属であり、それはそれのオクテットに1つの電子しか持っていないことを意味します。

  • So chlorine and sodium are so close to being satisfied

    だから、塩素とナトリウムは満たされているのに近い

  • that they will happily destroy anything in their path in order to fulfill their octet.

    彼らは喜んで彼らのオクテットを満たすために、彼らの道にあるものを何でも破壊するだろうと。

  • And thus, there's actually no better outcome than just to get

    そして、このように、そこには実際には得ることよりも良い結果はありません。

  • chlorine and sodium together and have them lovin' on each other.

    塩素とナトリウムを一緒にして、お互いにlovin'を持っています。

  • They immediately transfer their electrons.

    彼らはすぐに電子を転送します。

  • So that sodium doesn't have it's one extra, and chlorine fills it's octet.

    ナトリウムはそれを持っていないので、それは1つの余分なもので、塩素はそれのオクテットを埋めることになります。

  • They become Na+ and Cl- and are so charged that they stick together

    彼らはNa+とCl-になり、一緒に付着するように帯電しています。

  • and we call that stickiness an ionic bond.

    その粘着性をイオン結合と呼んでいます。

  • And just like if you have two really crazy friends

    本当に狂った友達が二人いても

  • it might be good to get them together so that they'll stop bothering you.

    それは彼らがあなたに迷惑をかけるのをやめるように、それらを一緒に取得するのが良いかもしれません。

  • Same thing works with sodium and chlorine.

    同じことがナトリウムと塩素で動作します。

  • You get those two together, and they'll bother no one.

    その二つを一緒にすれば、誰にも迷惑をかけない。

  • And suddenly, they don't want to destroy, they just want to be delicious.

    そして突然、彼らは破壊したいのではなく、ただ美味しく食べたいだけなのです。

  • Chemical changes like this are a big deal.

    このような化学変化は大変なことです。

  • Remember, chlorine and sodium, just a second ago, were definitely killing you, and now

    覚えておいてくれ、塩素とナトリウムは、ほんの少し前までは、間違いなくあなたを殺していた、そして今は

  • they're tasty.

    美味しいですよ。

  • Now we're coming to the last bond that we're going to discuss

    さて、最後の債券の話をします。

  • in our intro to chemistry here and that's the hydrogen bond.

    ここの化学のイントロダクションでは、水素結合のことを言っています。

  • Imagine that you remember water, I hope that you didn't forget water.

    あなたが水を覚えていることを想像して、私はあなたが水を忘れていなかったことを願っています。

  • Since water is stuck together in a polar covalent bond

    水は極性共有結合でくっついているので

  • the hydrogen bit is positively charge and the oxygen bit is negatively charged.

    水素ビットは正に帯電し、酸素ビットは負に帯電しています。

  • So when water molecules are moving around

    だから、水分子が動き回っているときに

  • we generally think of them as a perfect fluid but they actually stick together a little

    私たちは一般的に完全な液体と考えていますが、実際には少し一緒にくっついています。

  • bit.

    ビット。

  • Hydrogen side to oxygen side.

    水素側から酸素側へ。

  • You can actually see this with your eyes if you fill up a glass of water too full

    あなたは実際にあなたの目でこれを見ることができます あなたはあまりにもいっぱいの水のグラスを埋める場合は

  • it will bubble at the top. The water will stick together at the top.

    それは上部で泡立つでしょう上部で水がくっつきます

  • That's the polar covalent bonds sticking the water molecules to each other

    それは、水分子をお互いにくっつけている極性共有結合です。

  • so that they don't flow right over the top of the glass.

    彼らはガラスの上に右に流れることはありません。

  • These relatively weak hydrogen bonds happen in all sorts of chemical compounds

    このような比較的弱い水素結合は、あらゆる種類の化学化合物で発生します。

  • they don't just happen in water. An they actually play an extremely important role in proteins

    彼らは水の中で起こるだけではありません。実際にはタンパク質の中で非常に重要な役割を果たしています

  • which are the chemicals that pretty much up our entire bodies.

    私たちの体全体を構成する化学物質です。

  • A final thing to note here is that bonds, even covalent bonds, ionic bonds

    ここで最後に注意しなければならないのは、結合、たとえ共有結合、イオン結合であっても

  • even with their own class

    同級生でも

  • are often much different strengths.

    は、はるかに異なる強みであることが多いです。

  • And we tend to just write them with a little line

    そして、私たちは、それらを少しの行で書く傾向があります。

  • but that line can represent a very very strong covalent bond or a relatively weak covalent

    しかし、その線は非常に強い共有結合を表すこともあれば、比較的弱い共有結合を表すこともあります。

  • bond.

    絆。

  • Sometimes ionic bonds are stronger than covalent bonds

    イオン結合は共有結合よりも強いことがある

  • though that's generally not the case and the strength of covalent bonds varies wildly.

    しかし、一般的にはそうではなく、共有結合の強さは大きく異なります。

  • How these bonds are made and broken is intensely important to life.

    これらの絆がどのように作られ、どのように壊されるかは、人生にとって非常に重要なことです。

  • And to our lives. Making and breaking bonds is in fact the key to life itself

    そして、私たちの生活にも。絆を作ったり壊したりすることは、実は人生そのものの鍵なのです。

  • and also the key to death. For example, if you were to ingest some sodium metal.

    そして、死の鍵でもあります。例えば、金属ナトリウムを摂取していたとします。

  • Keep this in mind as we move forward through biology:

    このことを念頭に置きながら、生物学を進めていきましょう。

  • Even the sexiest person you have ever met in your life

    今までの人生で出会った中で一番セクシーな人でも

  • is just a collection of organic compounds rambling around in a sack of water.

    はただの有機化合物の集まりで、水の袋の中でゴロゴロしているだけです。