Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • How did you discover your passion

  • or find your career?

  • Were you exposed to it?

  • Or was it trial and error?

  • As child rights advocate Marian Wright Edelman said,

  • "You can't be what you can't see."

  • Fortunately, we now live in a time

  • when emerging technologies may help us to solve this problem.

  • For the past two years,

  • I've been developing an extended reality program

  • that enables middle school students from across the country

  • to take on the role of a marine biologist --

  • even if they've never seen the ocean.

  • As one seventh grader who recently completed our program said,

  • "I could see myself as a scientist,

  • because I enjoyed this game."

  • This feedback really excited me,

  • because too few students do see themselves as scientists.

  • A 2014 study showed that 57 percent of eighth- and ninth-grade students

  • said, "Science isn't me."

  • Coincidentally, also in 2014,

  • I met Mandë Holford, a marine biochemist,

  • and Lindsay Portnoy, an educational psychologist.

  • The three of us shared a passion

  • for getting students excited by and comfortable with science.

  • We thought about how we could give children

  • the most realistic experience of a scientific career.

  • We discussed the research;

  • it showed that students felt comfortable taking risks when playing games.

  • So the three of us started an educational games company

  • to bring science to life.

  • Virtual reality seemed like a low-cost way of increasing access.

  • In addition, academic research has shown

  • that virtual reality may lead to increases in learning retention.

  • This was perfect for us, as we wanted to be in schools

  • so that we could reach the most number of students possible,

  • particularly students who have been underrepresented in science.

  • So, with funding from the National Science Foundation,

  • we began developing our extended reality program

  • that combined virtual reality

  • with personalized digital journaling.

  • We worked with teachers while developing it

  • to ensure that it would fit seamlessly into existing curricula

  • and empower teachers to use cutting-edge technology in their classroom.

  • We designed the virtual reality for Google Cardboard,

  • which requires only a smartphone

  • and a 10 dollar VR viewer made of cardboard.

  • With this inexpensive headset,

  • students are transported to an underwater expedition.

  • Students use their digital journal

  • to write down their notes,

  • to answer questions,

  • to construct models

  • and to develop hypotheses.

  • Students then go to the virtual world to test their hypotheses

  • and see if they're accurate,

  • much as scientists go to the field

  • in their careers.

  • When students return to their digital journal,

  • they share their observations, claims,

  • reasoning and evidence.

  • The students' written answers and virtual interactions

  • are all updated live

  • in an educator assessment dashboard,

  • so that teachers can follow their progress

  • and support them as needed.

  • To give you a better sense, I'm going to show you

  • a little bit of what students see.

  • This is the virtual reality when they're underwater

  • observing the flora and fauna.

  • This is the digital journal where they're constructing their models

  • based on this abiotic data to show what they expect to see.

  • Here, they're supporting that with qualitative statements.

  • And this is the educator dashboard that shows progress

  • and enables [teachers] to see the students' answers as they go.

  • When we were creating BioDive,

  • again, we really wanted to focus on access,

  • so we designed it to require only one phone for every four students.

  • We also knew how collaborative science work is,

  • so we constructed the experience to only be solved

  • through collaborative teamwork,

  • as each student is an expert in a different geographic location.

  • Given that these children's brains are still developing,

  • we limited each experience to last a maximum of two minutes.

  • And finally, because we know the importance of repeated exposure

  • for internalizing knowledge,

  • we constructed BioDive to take place over five class periods.

  • We started piloting BioDive in 2017

  • in 20 schools in New York and New Jersey.

  • We wanted to see students as they were using this new technology.

  • In 2019, now,

  • we are now piloting in 26 states.

  • What we have heard from teachers who have taught our program:

  • "It was a nice way to show ocean dynamics without the luxury of actually being there

  • since we are in Ohio."

  • (Laughter)

  • "It's pretty mind-blowing."

  • "The students were totally engaged."

  • But what really gives us hope is what we're hearing from students.

  • "I liked how it felt like I was there."

  • "It's interactive and a fun way to learn."

  • "It really gave me realistic examples of how these organisms appear."

  • "I could see myself as a scientist because it seems really fun."

  • Our feedback wasn't always so positive.

  • When we began developing,

  • we started off by asking students

  • what they liked,

  • what they didn't like

  • and what they found confusing.

  • Eventually we began asking what they wished they could do.

  • Their feedback gave us concrete items to build in

  • to be sure that we were including student voices in what we were designing.

  • Overall, what we have learned is that this is the beginning of a new platform

  • for giving students both voice and ownership

  • in deciding how they want to have impact

  • in their careers.

  • We focused on science,

  • because we know we need scientists

  • to help us solve our current and future challenges.

  • But virtual reality could support students in any area.

  • How could we support students in exploring all of their desires

  • with these eye-opening experiences and chances to learn from primary sources?

  • Could we create VR for inexpensive headsets

  • that lets them be immersed in oral literature

  • or in critical moments of human history?

  • Extended reality has the potential to change the trajectory

  • of our children's lives

  • and lead them to careers they never imagined

  • by giving them the chance to see what they can be.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

How did you discover your passion

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

バーチャルリアリティが学生を科学者に変える方法|ジェシカ・オチョア・ヘンドリックス (How virtual reality turns students into scientists | Jessica Ochoa Hendrix)

  • 8 1
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語