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  • 26 years ago, a tiny political party was founded.

  • Its aim to pull the U.

  • K out of the U in just 100 hours time.

  • It would have achieved its aim.

  • Nigel Farage was a founder member of UKIP, led the party for nine years.

  • As Brexit switched from being the obsession of a minority to the will of the majority in turn, in the 2016 referendum.

  • Many say he is responsible for that.

  • So how does he think it came about?

  • Our political editor, Gary Given, sat down with Nigel Farage to take him through some of the big screen moments on the U.

  • K's journey to Brexit?

  • Well, Doc, two decades ago, three UKIP Emmy pees are elected to the European Parliament.

  • Faraj thinks this is the critical moment that started Britain's journey out of the U.

  • N.

  • Summit in a lob way.

  • That was the biggest moment of the lot because it was actually getting elected to that place that gave us some kind of a platform.

  • So suddenly you start to appear on news programs.

  • Suddenly you started out invitations to attend events on DDE.

  • We we use that opportunity on dhe, a big, absolutely honest.

  • We used the wherewithal provided by the European Parliament to build a UK political movement.

  • But the kicking off you couldn't have done any of this without proportional representation.

  • Of course, in those elections, of course gift.

  • Yeah, it is ongoing.

  • Strangled Without it, it's very difficult.

  • It might not have happened without those pressure points that you were able to apply in European elections through the Brexit wouldn't have happened without proportional representation.

  • Or, ironically, the European Parliament is the pressure from UKIP mounted David Cameron announced an in out referendum January 23rd January 2013.

  • And you're the one you got a real battles.

  • We've now got it on the agenda.

  • In his memoirs, David Caren says I wasn't all about Nigel Farraj.

  • Me calling this referendum.

  • It was something I could see coming down the tracks that had to be done.

  • Us, sir, Rot.

  • You know, they did not wanna have this referendum.

  • Scared him into that corner.

  • They were.

  • They were losing support to us in such a big way.

  • They were losing good people to us out around the country.

  • On his biggest fear of all was that a number of MPs across the floor and join us.

  • The fight over who would run the official leave campaign was dramatized by Channel four.

  • Dominic Cummings didn't want Nigel Farraj as the front man.

  • We need no people need 50% of the entire country possible.

  • One second fundamental of running a successful campaign.

  • Build a broad coalition of voters of that.

  • You need to be respectable.

  • No offense.

  • Seems Haynes from the TV Is this rope?

  • I'm devastated by the door every time that night in garages, popularity increases nationwide.

  • Support for breakfast in Ah Ah, yeah.

  • Why?

  • What's a rabbit?

  • I think I'd meet them and he tried to convince me that we should try and win the referendum to have a second referendum.

  • Is it What?

  • Is there a bit of truth in that relationship that he's?

  • He's sort of sitting there and saying he doesn't really want your about the place.

  • And you were saying, Actually, you needed to be the front man, That that's how No, no, I never I never said I know.

  • What I said was, that needs to be a big tent.

  • We gotta cooperate.

  • He did want to do that.

  • Boris actually did Well, I did speak to Boris.

  • All through the campaign are we shared notes and shared ideas have worked out.

  • He was gonna go where and he was gonna do what the Boris Johnson said If neither Raj is too close to the vote leave campaign.

  • We apparently used this phrase quite a lot in the room.

  • We'll get a stench of stale fags and beer.

  • What?

  • He might say that, but he But he meant something that would repel certain types of voters.

  • Well, as anyone.

  • I cooperated with Boris during the campaign.

  • Quite successfully, not with the others.

  • From calls texts.

  • You've waited till what about your campaign, but this one.

  • And you trusted him within reason.

  • In the end, both leave.

  • Campaign's focused on immigration.

  • Nigel Farraj, with this poster six days before the vote.

  • Know any women there?

  • Nobody Children, normally disabled people behind your are fleeing for their lives from a war in Syria.

  • You don't know that.

  • You don't know that they're coming from all over the world.

  • Do you have any regrets about that?

  • No, it was a photograph, but it was the truth.

  • It reflected the insanity of what was going on.

  • on these aren't refugees.

  • The potency of someone that's stronger stands related to immigration in the referendum was related to Turkey, not the immigration that already happened, but to Turkey.

  • Well, Turkey was a respected member of the I Look, Turk iwas the people that slightly Duncan.

  • That's the thing that made it very interesting that the whole immigration argument up until then had been about white people coming to Britain.

  • The holes Lithuania since was defusing of resentment among some voters about past waves of immigration from the common.

  • But I think that those images of Muslims on the move and out and about in the campaign you would often hear the referendum voters talking about We've got enough of them over here, Send them home and they were talking about you must have been in different places.

  • Romanians.

  • Okay, you must have.

  • You must have been different.

  • What?

  • You'll hear it every day.

  • We could hear it now 100 yards outside the studio, and you could hear many other things said, too.

  • But in terms of well, stirring that up look.

  • But the time we got to the referendum, you keep it already.

  • One of your appeal election.

  • Virtually one English county Council election.

  • And we done that talking about immigration off wipe off white Roman Catholics.

  • All right.

  • And the fact we haven't got control Dead Dream with the dawn is breaking theory.

  • Early hours of the morning after the referendum.

  • Nigel Farage is victory speech About £10 for it.

  • This will be a victory for riel people.

  • A victory for ordinary people.

  • A victory for decent people.

  • There were some of them on the other side then, yes, but also we have the self interested establishment also had a political class.

  • You couldn't give a damn what ordinary people think.

  • Way beyond what?

  • Anyone.

  • I'm gonna repeat that speech at 11 p.m. On the 31st of January this month.

  • Brexit is something the establishment did not want.

  • The political parties didn't want it.

  • The big businesses in one of the trade unions no longer wanted anything like it.

  • Most of the media had accepted it being the status quo, so you might demonize all of them.

  • But what about hospital technician in Cambridge?

  • You happen to know?

  • What about the fact?

  • What?

  • What about the fan?

  • What about the fact that every single member of parliament 10 years ago supported remain.

  • There were thousands of activists out there, you know, working with me, mostly.

  • But some other groups, too, who have managed through their own sheer hard work toe overturn a beat.

  • The establishment.

  • That is why I called it a victory for the little people.

  • People who were engaging in politics is say that you said real people, ordinary people in decent little people.

  • Asset just had it.

  • Yeah, well, yeah, really.

  • People not career politicians, people who got into politics, not because of what they could get out of it will happen to put the money into the only decent people in the country.

  • But they didn't give us the room.

  • They didn't give us 50 years of lies.

  • 50 years of life between that, lots of people who I presumed you would think we're decent, respectable, voted the other way.

  • Are you demonizing them?

  • I don't think it's very decent of willfully lie to a country.

  • Is was dining united summary people as well as was done in the 1975 referendum.

  • I think the extent to which we will be be misled what has been absolutely appalling could be the next one.

  • No.

  • Last year, Nigel Farrar set up a new political party, the Brexit party.

  • He wanted a save Brexit from its enemies in parliament when he was convinced, wanted to kill it off with returns to achieving it.

  • It was gone.

  • It was done.

  • It wasn't gonna happen.

  • The way we're gonna get through the agonies of a second referendum, you could see the momentum where it was.

  • And I think I think what we did but launching the Parsi reset the agenda.

  • And, as I say, the Conservative Party looked in the mirror when they saw us beginning to mass in Mesaba with hundreds of candidates for general election.

  • I think they looked in the mirror and said, We either adapt or we die and they've adapted.

  • And I think it led to Mrs May's resignation.

  • And I think when they saw it was summer, the fact that we would not go away, we're gonna go on to fight a general election.

  • That was when they decided, right, we are getting become the Brexit party and in a sense, that's what they did.

  • He's nicked your voters his next, some of your political close we get all of them and he's getting away with it.

  • Is that how you see at the Bowman?

  • I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt.

  • At the moment.

  • I'm trusting him to the liver.

  • Brexit policy is now in the hands of Boris Johnson.

  • Farraj is old enemy Dominic Cummings by his side.

  • Brexit's godfather.

  • Nowhere near the corridors of power.

  • Do you feel you've had the recognition creating Brexit that you deserve around the world?

  • Yes.

  • Here in north Acknowledged.

  • I have around the world absolutely around here.

  • How?

  • I don't know.

  • I think my old me people, Yes.

  • Bold re people who are interested in politics.

  • Yes, whichever side of the argument there are, but not by the country.

  • They have them in a national recognition alone.

  • Wouldn't expect that from these.

  • Those images are getting young man, you'll be sucked into this project.

  • But right back then you were You were a bunch of lonely cranks when you were regarded as that's how we were saying.

  • Yeah, yep.

  • That's how we were seen on this issue on the European.

  • It's you are all the other things we fought for and started to talk about development build as policy ideas would be considered.

  • Yet we were the outsiders.

  • We were free cakes.

  • We were the women takes.

  • And you know what?

  • It's all mainstream now.

26 years ago, a tiny political party was founded.

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ナイジェル・ファラージ氏は、Brexitがどのようにして生まれたと考えているかを説明しています。 (Nigel Farage explains how he thinks Brexit came about)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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