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  • wait.

  • There's no substitute, which my woods good, just like and wait.

  • Improvisation.

  • Improvisation can help us to unlock our best Selves, but it can be scary to even think about incorporating improvising into our lives, especially as educators isn't good planning the secret to success?

  • Well, yes, but sometimes when we overthink or over prepare, we end up talking ourselves right out of what is natural and uniquely interesting about ourselves.

  • What if you have gifts and abilities that have been lying dormant because you haven't allowed yourself to explore them for fear of doing it?

  • Wrong of making a mistake?

  • Dr.

  • Charles Jay Lim is a neuroscientist, musician and surgeon.

  • He's a busy guy, and he has spent much of his career studying creativity and improvising.

  • Specifically, he says, although people don't often associate creativity with science, actually, the two are inseparable.

  • To come up with new theories to test, you need to be able to think creatively.

  • I'll share more about his work later.

  • So what is improvising in my world is a musician.

  • The simplest definition is that it is to make up something on the spot without previous preparation or written down music.

  • When I was studying jazz at Humber College in Toronto.

  • We spent a lot of time learning how to improvise or rather developing the skills needed to improvise.

  • So we spent countless hours practicing different scales and modes and court progressions and grooves.

  • And the study never really ends, like still studying to this day.

  • But we do the work so that we can be free to take risks, because when you're improvising with other people, the most important thing is listening is being able to stay in the moment.

  • We need to trust that our fellow band mates will go with that.

  • They'll say yes to our ideas, and we, in turn, must do the same for them.

  • When I was at school learning how to improvise or scat as it's called for vocalist, a data did and that I found it terrifying.

  • I couldn't get over the idea of making a mistake in front of other people.

  • So the hardest part was and is turning down.

  • The volume on the critic within experience has taught me that the less you worry about making a mistake, more likely you are to experience a moment that feels transcendent.

  • So then there's also Improv Theatre improv, And it's similar in that most or all of it is unscripted or unplanned, the principles that helped guide and proper known as the Four Seas creativity, collaboration, critical thinking and Communication.

  • Today, improv, as you probably know, is used for team building and trust exercises as a way to combat social anxiety and more.

  • Viola's Bolin is often called the mother of improv, and many of the theater techniques and games that she devised in the thirties and forties are still used today.

  • There is so much I could tell you about her incredible life and work.

  • But what I want to focus in on is her philosophy, which was that improv is a means to help individuals overcome the approval.

  • Disapproval syndrome, she said, blocked them from their own natural creativity in an effort to please others.

  • I can relate.

  • Can you relate so improv?

  • It frees us from the confines of our own self conscious evaluative and repetitive stories, and we experience the energetic emergence of the intuitive, and that's what makes transformation possible when I am improvising or jamming with friends, especially for starting from scratch with which I like to do, um it feels like a fire.

  • Initially, there's this spark.

  • This idea could be groove Court changes the riff something that ignites the rest of us and sets us off on a different course.

  • And each person brings all that they are and have experienced to the moment.

  • And the magic happens when the spark gives way to a wildfire infused by our wild abandon and freedom from judgment.

  • The delicate balance of the fires, ferocity and its unpredictability versus the deep trust and listening that's required is what delivers the gold in my life as a musician and music educator.

  • Improvising has come to be a really important part of the way I approach most things.

  • Except for this talk, some of the best performances and songs I've written have come about when I've dared to say yes to the moment.

  • Sometimes I say things say yes to things that feel a little beyond my comfort level or depth, but they've ended up being richly rewarding on duh.

  • I've learned over time that needing to control everything, it isn't always the best approach.

  • Loosening that grip can help yield some of the best outcomes.

  • It's about being open to the business of the present going with it being in the flow, and it can teach us to make decisions with conviction, to listen before responding, to laugh at ourselves, to get better at taking cues.

  • These are all great skills to home, not just for artists, but for everyone.

  • If we can treat more of our interactions as an invitation to discover something to reveal what's beneath the surface, then we're less likely to lead with ego and were more likely to connect on a deeper level as people, as facilitators.

  • As educators.

  • Remember Dr Lim, the neuroscientist musician, he designed sophisticated ways of attempting to study improvising using functional Emery's.

  • So his subjects jazz musicians and rappers were placed in the machine where they performed a memorized piece versus something improvised and regarding what he saw during improvisation, he says.

  • In simplistic terms, it seems, during spontaneous creative modes that there is deactivation in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex.

  • I'll explain.

  • He's basically saying that the parts of the brain that are responsible for self monitoring self awareness introspection are shut off during improvisation, which is a good thing because they can impede the goal of creativity of free flowing output, the parts of the brain that air thought to turn on or related to language and our self expressive and autobiographical, he says.

  • One area turns on, but one big area shuts off so that you're not inhibited.

  • You're willing to make mistakes.

  • I find his work fascinating because he's attempting to prove with science what is already intuitively known so short of signing up for an improv class, which we should probably all do.

  • How can we learn to be improvisational?

  • What does that approach mean for people who are not necessarily artists?

  • I can't take the long way around.

  • When I was in my late teens and early twenties, I studied with a performance coach named Art Nevsky in Toronto, and he ran a group classes to help get people over the fear of performing.

  • And much like Viola Smolen, he had made a bunch of weird games and roles to play that he would literally shout out to us while we were performing our songs for the others in the group.

  • Stick your tongue out being a diva like Celine Dion, and he meant, do it Now, um, I I see now that a lot of those interruptions, constant interruptions served is away.

  • To trick our brains into staying in the present, we simply had no time to get to self absorbed in judgment.

  • He would also urge us to try new things and even the smallest ways to sort of build up the muscle while comb on a different route.

  • Have your coffee from a different mug.

  • Brush your teeth with the other hand.

  • You might notice new things because your awareness is heightened because you're doing it differently so we can look for more of these moments.

  • We can learn to say yes more.

  • I'll add that allowing our curiosity and our child like fascinations to be in charge more often is another good place to start.

  • We can also listen deeply, meet people where they're at, allow them to finish before try to interject and steer the moment into something that makes us feel more comfortable when we are vulnerable.

  • We allow our humanity to peek through like an indicator light going off to let other.

  • No others know that it's gonna be safe for them to show us there's two, and I believe this is rich and fertile ground for sharing and growing learning.

  • So it's pretty evident by now that part of improvisation is being in the moment.

  • It's like when you're on a roller coaster the way up filled with anticipation, HS notice, maybe dread.

  • You're nervously trying to calculate as you go up how, while the drop is gonna feel when you start to free fall on the way down, there's literally nowhere else that exist.

  • But where you are, right, whether you love it or hate it, it's the only thing that you're experiencing and reacting to in that moment, not what you're gonna have for dinner.

  • Not the snappy retort you couldn't think of yesterday.

  • That moment is all there is, which is part of what makes experiences like that so thrilling.

  • One of my favorite artists, Bobby McFarren, has taken improvising in a vocal context to incredible heights.

  • Several years ago I was watching a video where he's being interviewed and just kind of giving advice to aspiring singers, and he challenged us to improvise for 10 minutes a day, continuously for at least 21 days.

  • I decided to try the challenge, and it was challenging because I was used to improvising in the contacts of with other people, other musicians.

  • He was asking us to just play with our voices in the air every day continuously, with no judgment.

  • I did find it tricky to just show up to the task at hand and not try to judge if I was doing it right or wrong.

  • Eventually, though, it became something that I loved.

  • And it ends up feeling sort of like a meditation for me to make time to play with my first instrument, my voice.

  • It has also become a way for me to invite new songs into existence, have them reveal themselves.

  • I like to use my looper pedal and my voice to create soundscapes and textures to then build on and on my upcoming album, Love and Protests.

  • A lot of the songs were born out of this play with my voice and my looper.

  • I'd like to share a part of one of them with you now, and it's called Where We Belong.

  • Just know that I am a judge when you're not way when you come on down and wait Oh, everyone's way.

  • Wait, wait way.

  • Find songs on the way when I feel your way because everyone way.

  • All have Wait is Wait, wait, wait Waken all explore.

  • I'm tapped potential by learning to live a little bit more freely.

  • Thank you.

wait.

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即興演奏。あなたの未開拓の可能性を探る|ジョニ・ネリタ|TEDxKitchenerED (Improvisation: Exploring your untapped potential | Joni NehRita | TEDxKitchenerED)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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