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  • visibility is the rule of the day.

  • Identity is forged by cliques and followers.

  • Social media invites us to post our most cherished personal experiences online and facial recognition Technology tracks our every move.

  • Transparency is a condition of modern times, and often this makes sense.

  • Connective ity is essential to human experience, and to see and be seen is vital to who we are.

  • That said, there's it still seems that sometimes we put a disproportionately high value on public identity when transparency and visibility rain.

  • We can forget the value of being alone, of being remote, of being under the radar.

  • And we forget the fact that we're really actually just one small part of a larger collective.

  • So I'm not saying invisibility is always good.

  • In fact, it's not there plenty of times when lack of visibility opens us to abuse, neglect, even violence.

  • But still there are times from stepping out of the spotlight.

  • Does this good?

  • And as someone who writes about nature and culture and design, I became interested in how this happens and why.

  • And so I spent the last two years talking to a lot of people scientists, biologists, physicists, psychologists, artists, and designers and poets and writers and kids I talked to.

  • I talked to a whole bunch of kids, and what I learned was that in a wide range of human experience, invisibility is a positive condition.

  • It enhances our creativity, and it also helps to connect us more both to ourselves and to others.

  • Certainly when were kids Invisibility is the route to creativity.

  • It's also a route to independence and to resourcefulness.

  • When we were kids, we learn about the ephemeral ality of language through invisible ink and those staples and so much of Children's literature.

  • The hats, the cloaks, the capes, the rings, all of that stuff that allows kids to think they've disappeared.

  • Um, allow kids to think they're unseen.

  • And in that unseen world, they kind of get this kind of taste of hidden power and secret knowledge.

  • Um, Children also love to experience invisibility spatially the upper rings of the upper limbs of the beech tree where I found Haven.

  • It's a child allowed me to uh allowed me to disappear, allowed me to exist remotely, separately, apart from my family and every every limb of that tree was a step towards autonomy.

  • It was the place where my imagination flourished and it sounds simple looking back on it.

  • But, um What?

  • What?

  • I was up there.

  • It was really just It was looking back.

  • It was a way to disappear.

  • And I found when I disappeared this way that it was It was just that I wasn't with my family that I didn't even need to be.

  • In their view, I didn't even need to be in their sight to feel really.

  • And I think for a lot of kids, this is kind of revelation.

  • You don't have to be seen to be rial.

  • I know it was a revelation for me, and and the empire of childhood is full of these spaces.

  • The closet, the attic, the nook under the stairs, the cabinet wherever it is that kids go to vanish into their own worlds and their own imaginations in their own worlds of private power.

  • Kids don't just love to be invisible.

  • They love to experience what is invisible and invisible.

  • Friends come in all shapes and sizes.

  • They could be confidence for secrets, subjects of devotion, invisible allies, invisible adversaries.

  • But what all of these do is they teach kids something about what it is to be known by another.

  • And they also say something to kids about what it is to have this deep core of private awareness that kids kids sometimes take a while to find.

  • This could be especially true for teenagers who are trying to negotiate a root away from their parents and who sort of have some some instinct.

  • Some clue that maybe their peers don't yet have all the answers.

  • So they kind of form these relationships with with invisible companions, maybe celebrities who don't have a clue they exist and they, you know, sort of sort of big begin to work out what it is to be known by another and what it is to know another.

  • And I think I think there's something here that maybe carries into adulthood.

  • I think there's something here for most of us.

  • I mean, how many of us have had, you know, have worked out a problem we have with a partner or a friend in a conversation?

  • When we're driving in the car all by ourselves, right?

  • How many of us, you know, sort of talk things out with favorite characters in plays or novels, and how many of us just kind of work things out in our mind by having conversations with people who don't happen to be in the room in disability in nature is more is about power, and it's about necessity to exist in the in the mountains, in the Forrester, in the deep sea.

  • We have to be quiet.

  • We have to be still.

  • We have to step back because otherwise those places are unlikely to accept us.

  • When I'm diving in the deep sea, my sense of presence is diluted.

  • It's not exactly that I'm invisible, but rather I'm un perceived.

  • My ego dissolves when I'm underwater.

  • I carry myself differently, and floating among the tortoise is the sea urchins wth e angel fish.

  • I find myself suspended not only in water but in time.

  • And if the blue tang searching for algae orthe e spotted butterfly fish foraging, foraging for tiny invertebrates are indifferent to my presence.

  • That indifference is exactly what allows me to enter their world.

  • For biologists in their fieldwork, invisibility is a condition of knowledge, whether they're researchers and the glaciers are in the desert or in the In The woodlands, they actively worked to be invisible, so those places will better.

  • Except, um, and it's the way that they learn about animal behavior, vanishing species, a changing environment or put it out whatever it is they're trying to understand.

  • And I think again, this lesson also has relevance to us because sometimes whether it's at the at the dinner table, the family dinner table or the office conference table just listening without responding, just paying attention.

  • Just observing just being absorbed in the conversation is what's going to give us knowledge.

  • There is so much to be learned when we're not working to make ourselves visible.

  • There's so much to be learned when we allow people to tell their own stories, whether it's a teenager trying to explain their angst, er, a client talking about some problem they're having when we let people just tell their stories and we absorb wth, um, that could be that could be the important thing.

  • I found that invisibility also involves anonymity and human affinity.

  • Vast public spaces, whether it's ah World football match in Wembley Stadium or a concert at Madison Square Garden, generate a vast sense of social congeniality when tens of thousands of people are doing the same thing at the same time.

  • Whether it's you know, waving glow sticks with Mick Jagger or cheering a striker's goal sense of collectivity sets in, it's it's kind of primal collectivity that it's not really some single collective brain.

  • Rather, it just kind of says something about our knack for social cohesion.

  • And then there's the invisibility that comes with age.

  • Um, and this This works to enhance our sense of social empathy.

  • Age comes in with a kind of flickering presence were in and out of public view.

  • And this could work for us because we have a greater set of choices of when and how to be seen.

  • Re reading the celebrated novelist British novelist of the 20th century Virginia Woolf, I encountered her heroine, Mrs Dalloway.

  • Clarissa Dalloway is a woman of means.

  • She's a woman of a certain age, and she's living in London after the end of World War, and she's walking down a London street and she's stealing un observed unrecognized, unseen that if she's feeling invisible, No.

  • One Caesar pays the slightest bit of attention, and she's reflecting on the fact that, you know, why is it that women of that age are only known by their shoes or their handbags or their husband's surnames.

  • And she's having this whole kind of reverie about being invisible.

  • But at the same time, she's aware, very attuned to all the people around her, and it's almost she feels as though she almost knows them psychically and intuitively, she knows who they are.

  • For her, being unseen is not a condition of, um, it's not a condition that limits her life, but one that sustains and informs her life.

  • It's not about being dismissed or ignored or disparaged.

  • Rather, it's about being more psychic.

  • Lee absorbed into the larger world around her as the writer Virginia Woolf WAAS, um perceptive and precedent about human behavior.

  • And, as it turns out, modern social research century later confirms her thinking.

  • We humans, it turns out we're in altruistic species.

  • But our sense of kindness and goodness comes for the most.

  • And fairness comes not from temperament and disposition, but rather, the data suggests.

  • It comes from our place in the social social hierarchy, status, prestige, reputation.

  • And it turns out that being inconspicuous is something that can connect us more to a kind of larger humanitarian view of things.

  • Being unrecognized can help us recognize and acknowledge the emotional states of others.

  • And perhaps most to the point, it closes in to, you know, kind of what our place really is.

  • In the larger scheme of things, being unseen takes us from self interest to a larger self of inclusion in the human family.

  • And sometimes being invisible is just about losing sight of yourself.

  • And this is what I learned in the end is that sometimes finding your place is a matter of losing at first, and that sometimes what's required of us is negotiating that that route between ray shirt and exposure, both conditions of great power.

  • Because I think the bottom line is that each one of us is capable of being that place where visibility and invisibility converge with grace and ease.

visibility is the rule of the day.

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見えない力|Akiko Busch|TED Institute (The power of invisibility | Akiko Busch | TED Institute)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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