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  • In this video I'm gonna show you what a New Year's holiday is like in the home of a Japanese family

  • During the New Year's holiday Japanese families usually gather in spent time together just like the Christmas holidays in Western countries

  • So for this New Year's holiday, Maiko and I decided to spend time with her family

  • So we're in Maiko's hometown Aichi which is about three hours of south of Tokyo

  • And this house behind me is a house that she actually grew up in and since I'm already here for the holidays

  • I wanted to take this opportunity to show you guys what it's like inside

  • Their home, how they spend the Japanese holidays, what they eat, what they do

  • Hopefully we make it to the shrine and maybe a little bit of the house itself and today is December 31st

  • New Year's Eve day. It's about 10 o'clock right now, but let's start this video in the morning

  • All right, that feels a little bit better. I got my coffee now. It's still 7:30 everyone is still asleep

  • Just got to wait for everyone to wake up now, Check some email

  • We're actually in her old brother's room right now. I don't know if you guys can see this, Maiko was still in the bed

  • She had a long night. Time to take a shower

  • Right so not a lot of stuff is happening this morning. Dad went back to sleep

  • Maiko's mom is in the kitchen

  • Maiko's over there doing her makeup

  • Let me just show you around the house while we have some time because we're not really doing so much what right now

  • I guess this is like part of the day not a lot happens

  • So this is a typical house in Aichi

  • Countryside/ Two stories, three bedrooms, living, dining, and kitchen and even a cool Tatami room with a personal shrine

  • All right so this right behind me is their backyard as you can see, it's actually quite bigger

  • Then you would expect specially when comparing it to Tokyo

  • There's Coco

  • At the front of the house there's usually a family name tag like this and this laced rope like decoration is called Shimenawa

  • It's a special decoration for the new year. It's supposed to exorcise bad fortunes in Maiko's parents house. It's everywhere, in the kitchen, bathroom

  • Etc. And at the main entrance, there's a Shochikubai Banzai, which is also a New Year's decoration

  • Shochikubai means pine, bamboo, and plum tree. Pine and bamboo stay green all year round and plum trees bloom beautifully in winter

  • So it symbolizes remaining faithful and a healthy long life

  • This is the kitchen

  • It's got a typical stainless sink, built-in gas stove with three burners, and a small fish grill. Dishwasher, family size refrigerator

  • Oven, microwave, rice cooker, and a toaster. This is the Kamidana Shinto altar

  • The miniature shrine can be found in many Japanese households, shops, and sometimes offices for daily worship since it's a New Year's chimney

  • Shimenawa and Saki is added as offerings and Maiko's dad placed a big jumbo lottery ticket here

  • How cool would that be if they won? All right, so this is the second floor toilet. It's actually quite interesting

  • Just the way they save water and space at once. I really want to show you

  • This is Maiko's sister's room right here. And this is the toilet right here, and you can see there's actually not a lot of space

  • Let's open this door

  • So you can see right behind me. This is the entire toilet bathroom space. Like right here is the door

  • Here's a toilet

  • So if you were to sit down in this like my knees are pretty much hitting the door

  • But this is common for a secondary toilet in Japan. The main downstairs toilet is much larger and has a separate sink area

  • Just wanted to show you how space efficient homes are in Japan

  • But what's interesting about this toilet is that you've probably seen in my other video the actual sink is built into the toilet

  • So what happens is when you flush the toilet the water comes down into here

  • You can wash your hands and then that water is used to fill up the toilet

  • It's actually a pretty cool way to save water and it also saves space because there's actually not a lot of room

  • To put another sink in here and obviously it has this bidet control so you have all that functionality

  • It has a seat warmer

  • One thing you find on a Japanese home is that people love to watch TV and just sit around all day

  • Especially on days like this when no one has work or they just like sit around and watch TV and

  • Japanese TV is probably like the most interesting

  • during the New Year's holiday because they know people are gonna be sitting at home doing nothing and just

  • Relaxing and having a good time with your family

  • And so the program it's actually pretty good. The one time that I do watch TV

  • Japanese TV is like this time because they have really interesting programming

  • So Maiko's younger sister needs to be dropped off at the station. She's actually spending New Year's with her friends in Kyoto

  • There goes one family member

  • So just dropped her off at the train station and now we're going to the supermarket to pick up some food. It's actually quite late

  • So I think you might just have lunch there or somewhere

  • Not very traditional in my eyes but apparently like us is that Japanese people don't celebrate at lunch in the New Year's, right?

  • Don't celebrate it (Maiko) Nope

  • Cause you- (Maiko)There's nothing to celebrate for lunch.

  • This place is just as so busy right now. Hopefully here shopping done with work quickly go back home

  • The supermarket is filled with people. In fact, I've been to this market before but it was never anything like this

  • So we've been waiting in line forever, the lines are so long on New Year's Day

  • Reminder to get your stuff before New Year's Day. Otherwise, we'll be waiting

  • There's like so many people

  • All that wait for a self checkout line to scan your items and go. Is it this convenient in your country?

  • We're just gonna relax for a little bit and I think we're gonna start cooking. We means my mom

  • Well, we already has a lot of stuff cooked and in my family we don't serve drinking early or anything

  • So one thing I learned about the supermarket just now

  • I actually offered, told Maiko that we should pay for the groceries

  • But Maiko told me that that if we did it be very rude to pay for the groceries

  • Because we are the guests in the house even though I wanted to help out

  • I guess you really aren't supposed to help out in the situation

  • Your parents are poor.

  • Maiko- I know but if you're like offering the support in a financial that means you are showing that oh

  • I'm making more money than you guys.

  • Paolo- it's weird because I think in my family if I were to

  • Come home and help pay for groceries and actually be happy.

  • I think they'd be happy.

  • Yeah, I think it's culturally, like yeah

  • I think in my culture its easier to like

  • Accept like like if someone has more money than you it's not like, oh they're better than you just like. Oh, okay. Cool

  • Thank you. I appreciate it.

  • How about you guys? What's your culture? Like is it okay to pay is it not? I'm not quite sure

  • Let me know in the comments. So here's the problem today since I woke up so early. I'm gonna be super tired

  • So I'm trying to figure out when to take a nap

  • We're supposed to have dinner at around 6:00 6:45, and we leave here at 11:30. So maybe after dinner. I'll go and take a nap

  • But the problem with that is you don't want to like take a nap right after you eat, right?

  • Anyways, it's about

  • 2:30 right now dad's out

  • We just got back from shopping and it sounds Maiko's sister's gone for the rest of the trip

  • And it's just us

  • You think about like during the Christmas holidays like family everyone comes home and you're supposed to have a

  • reconnection of people getting together but this time around it's like

  • brothers gone, Maiko's sister's gone and it's just us four but I guess that's like

  • You know that that happens

  • Right and a lot of families not everyone comes home or everyone like starts getting older and they have different plans

  • So anyways, we'll just continue on. Okay. So Maiko's just turning on TV and watching TV now. This is like a constant theme

  • Probably for this video. So as you can see behind me they're just sitting back having some coffee, some donuts

  • It's not very Japanese thing. But Krispy Kreme is now around Japan. So what else do you guys expect?

  • Coco-chan

  • Coco

  • Hey Coco

  • Maiko- I just cut these

  • And make it break

  • The final meal is prepared you can see behind me. Happy New Years guys. We're about to have our final meal of the year

  • So this is what we're having for New Year's dinner. What goes on the table really depends on the family and where you live

  • Maiko's family dinner is based on traditions in Nagano Prefecture where her dad is from so I'm quite interested in the menu you have Toshi

  • Toshitori-zakana which is grilled yellowtail, burdock, pickled octopus, marinated herring roe, Namasu

  • Marinated bean curd, Chikuzeni which is a broad vegetable and chicken and lots of Sashimi

  • Since Nagano is an inland Prefecture seafood used to be considered a luxury food. And so nowadays

  • It's a must-have on the menu to celebrate the new year and my favorite is a Chawanmushi

  • It's kind of like a hot steamy egg pudding

  • They're watching TV again

  • Japanese people just love watching TV. All right. So now we're gonna do Hatsumode it's about

  • 12:40 right now and instead of like going out to like the city center and go party and drinking and celebrate the countdown

  • People actually go to the shrine. I can't believe like the family will get together. It's already like it's late

  • I don't know if you can see what I face. I'm so - super tired actually fell asleep a little bit. I'm excited

  • I've actually never been to Hatsumode

  • I've done it after the New Year's but I've never actually gone to the shrine at midnight

  • Ever.

  • As long as I've been in Japan.

  • Matsumoto is known as the first shrine visit of the year. Maiko's family goes at midnight

  • So we left the house about 15 minutes before the New Year. Its standard to go to the family's local gods shrine

  • Which is usually the closest one but it's also okay to visit other shrines or more than one for Hatsumode

  • Oh wow there's a huge fire burning

  • There's just something magical about being at a shrine at midnight to welcome in the New Year. If you guys ask me what to do

  • For the New Year's in Japan

  • I suggest trying this at least once as this is so much different than any New Year's I have ever spent

  • After praying at the main altar and the ones on the side, it's time to check out the Futami

  • Which is food offered by the shrine during Hatsumode. So the shrine was offering Oshiruko red bean soup with mochi balls

  • I've known shrines to give away sacred alcohol called Omiki and Amazake. All right, Happy New Year's guys. It's officially

  • 2019. What's really nice too is they hand out soup to everyone so let's go get some soup

  • Looks like - Oh it has like little balls of mochi, so this is called Shitako

  • It's a red bean soup. I thought it was gonna be like a Miso. It's red beans

  • Guess they don't know at this shrine

  • It appears a tradition is to gather around the large crackling fire and greet with neighbors for the New Years while eating the hot soup

  • Definitely love the local vibe here

  • All right so we just got back and now we're gonna have a little Kampai toast. this is Toshikoshi soba

  • It's supposed to help celebrate the New Year in a long

  • Prosperous life. Have long thin noodles to symbolize long life a long year, happy year

  • Prosperous year. It's 12:30 right now. We just got back and we're still eating. We're like eating all day

  • The next morning January 1st people eat

  • Osechi which is a traditional Japanese

  • New Year's food and served in this pretty delicate box called Jubako. Forgot to hit record on the main camera

  • So here's my Instagram story

  • And don't forget to follow my Instagram account to see what I'm doing on a daily basis. Also served is Ozoni soup

  • Which is completely different in each area. So again, we're basing another Nagano Prefecture customs in the Dashi soup

  • You'll find chicken, Shiitake, bamboo shoots, ox eye cabbage. Kamaboko fishcake. Yam. And of course Mochi

  • All right so that concludes the video. If you liked it help me out and hit that like button

  • Let me know what you thought about how to Japanese family spends the holidays and let me know in the comments what the difference is

  • Between your home and Japan and if you want to see more my adventures in Japan

  • I released a video every Saturday morning and sometimes Wednesdays

  • So hit that subscribe button and the bell button and I'll catch you guys in the next one

In this video I'm gonna show you what a New Year's holiday is like in the home of a Japanese family

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日本の平均的な家庭の中は、お正月のようなもの (What Inside an Average Japanese Family's Home is like New Year's Holiday)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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